Alaska

Alaska
About Us

In Alaska we are shared stewards of world renowned natural resources and our nation’s last true wild places. The lands and waters of this place we call home nourish a vast and unique array of fish, wildlife and people. We cultivate a reverent awareness and respect for all things, from Alaska’s smallest plants and most iconic animals to its diverse communities and cultures. Our hope is that each generation has the opportunity to live with, live from, discover and enjoy the wildness of this awe-inspiring land and the people who love and depend on it.

Alaska's National Wildlife Refuges

We are shared stewards of 16 refuges in Alaska totaling over 76 million acres: Alaska Maritime, Alaska Peninsula, Arctic, Becharof, Innoko, Izembek, Kanuti, Kenai, Kodiak, Koyukuk, Nowitna, SelawikTetlin, Togiak, Yukon Delta, Yukon Flats

Regional and Field Offices

Our Alaska regional office is in Anchorage, Alaska and houses staff from all Service programs including (but not limited to) our Alaska Marine Mammals Management Office, Alaska Migratory Birds Office, and Conservation Genetics Lab. Our field offices include our Northern Alaska Fish and Wildlife Field Office (Fairbanks), Southern Alaska Fish and Wildlife Field Office (Anchorage), our Kenai Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office in Soldotna, a small office in Juneau, and a satellite office in Utqiaġvik (formerly Barrow).

Connect with Us

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Medium and check out our two podcasts: Fish of the Week!/ My Life Wildlife

In This Region
Alaska

Leadership

Regional Highlights

Berry received the Valor Award at the U.S. Department of the Interior Honor Awards Convocation in Washington D.C. on Sept 12, 2019 for rescuing a Selawik resident stranded on river ice during break up.
Seabirds depend on the world’s oceans for food and spend most of their lives at sea.
“Our habitat team has put in a lot of fish-friendly culverts,” says Heather, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s current fish passage engineer in Alaska. "And we have a lot more planned. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is committed to doing everything possible to improve prospects for salmon.”
From spunky inflatable skiffs to a fully equipped 120-foot research ship, boats give our scientists access to the immense 6,640 mile coastline of Alaska (over 30,000 miles if you count all the islands. Which we do.). Boats also help us to study the wildlife that depends on the diverse marine waters...
Greg Fratis, Sr. was two years old the day his village of St. Paul, Alaska was forcibly evacuated during World War II. Years later, he heard the full story from his elders: the town’s annual baseball tournament was underway when a relative ran home with the news on June 14, 1942.
We sat down with fish biologist Randy Brown to talk about the Dolly Varden of Alaska's North Slope/Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.
Perspectives from the first Indigenous woman to ever serve as a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Native American liaison
Trimble Gilbert is a Gwich’in Elder and speaker of Dinjii Zhuh Ginjik, the Gwich’in language. He was born and raised in Arctic Village, Alaska where he currently resides. Trimble shares his observations of birds from over the years, traditional stories told by his Elders, and changes in weather and...
Why are two and a half million acres of land in Northwest Alaska conserved as a wildlife refuge? What makes this place so special? In a word, wetlands. The lands that today make up Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, and that are the homeland of generations of Iñupiat, are top-notch wildlife habitat...