Highly pathogenic avian influenza & other frequently asked bird health questions

Highly pathogenic avian influenza has been confirmed in both domestic and wild birds in Canada and the United States. The strain now present in North America has caused illness and death in waterfowl, shorebirds, gulls, and birds of prey. Birds that migrate to Alaska to nest and breed could be infected. Learn more including steps hunters can take to reduce infection risk and how to report observations/concerns. See also: Alaska Bird FAQ: if it's sick, abandoned, injured or dead

Based in Fairbanks, and in collaboration with our Utqiaġvik (Barrow) Satellite Office, we work with others to deliver conservation over approximately 338-million acres of Alaska. Our responsibilities generally range from the Yukon River Delta region in southwest Alaska, eastward to the Canadian border and northward. Our work also involves offshore federal waters in the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort seas.

About Us

Our staff work in an area that stretches across the northern part of Alaska. 

What We Do

We specialize in ecology, biology, fisheries science and management, project evaluation and mitigation, statistics, environmental contaminants, and working with federally-qualified subsistence users. We work side-by-side with myriad partners to understand, protect and restore aquatic resources of northern Alaska, assist management of subsistence fish species and uphold the U.S.-Canada Yukon River Salmon Agreement, assess, minimize and mitigate the impacts of large-scale development projects, recover listed eider species, restore degraded habitats, and build positive relationships with others to conserve fish, wildlife and their habitats for the American people and future generations. Some of the services we provide within the communities we serve include technical assistance, funding, and conservation capacity and guidance. 

Our Organization

The Ecological Services Program works to restore and protect healthy populations of fish, wildlife, and plants and the environments upon which they depend. Using the best available science, we work with federal, state, Tribal, local, and non-profit stakeholders, as well as private land owners, to...
The Fish and Aquatic Conservation program leads aquatic conservation efforts for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We are committed to tackling the nation’s highest priority aquatic conservation and recreational challenges to conserve, restore, and enhance fisheries for future generations.
The Fish Passage Program works with local communities on a voluntary basis to restore rivers and conserve our nation’s aquatic resources by removing or bypassing barriers. Our projects benefit both fish and people.
The Partners for Fish and Wildlife Program provides free technical and financial assistance to landowners, managers, tribes, corporations, schools and nonprofits interested in improving wildlife habitat on their land. Since 1987, we have helped more than 60,000 landowners restore more than 7...

Projects and Research

Our Library

Location and Contact Information