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Conserving the Nature of America
Yellow prairie coneflowers reach for the sun at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge in North Dakota. Birds and butterflies love the flowers, at their showiest from midsummer to early fall. Credit:  Kirsten Brennan / USFWS
Susan Jewell says the conservation path chose her. Credit: Photo Courtesy of Susan Jewell

Fish & Wildlife News: Why I Conserve

May 19, 2017
Helping to protect and conserve the wild things and wild places makes for a wonderful career. In the spring issue of the Service’s magazine, employees tell us why they conserve.
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Puffin landing at Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Rose Walunas / USFWS
Yellow prairie coneflowers at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge in North Dakota. Credit:  Kirsten Brennan / USFWS

Wildflowers Put on a Show

May 18, 2017
Nature’s wildflower displays are often spectacular at national wildlife refuges. That’s because refuges conserve many native plants, while protecting large tracts of undeveloped land.
Photo Essay »
Puffin landing at Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Rose Walunas / USFWS
Puffin landing at Maine Coastal Islands National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Rose Walunas / USFWS

Perfect Pairs: Complement Your National Park Trip with a Stop at a Nearby Wildlife Refuge

May 17, 2017
Visiting a national park this summer? Pair it with a side trip to a less discovered cousin – a national wildlife refuge. The National Wildlife Refuge System, protects natural habitat for America's treasured wildlife species, helps clean our air and water and offers access to world-class recreation, such as fishing, hunting and nature watching. And often, they are way less crowded.
Bulletin »
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