link to fws.gov homepage
Conserving the Nature of America
A group of wood stork near grass and a body of water.
Representing a conservation milestone, South Carolina topped Florida in total number of nesting wood stork pairs. Credit: Christy Hand, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources.

Wood Storks Expand Northward as Wetlands are Restored

May 22, 2020

Listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, wood stork populations in Florida have been expanding north in recent years to Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina. This is due in part to wetland restoration efforts by the Service and partners on public and private lands, and to places like Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia. 

More Information »


Adult silver carp be held in hands.

Adult silver carp. Credit: USFWS

Taking Back our Waters

May 22, 2020

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began work to keep invasive Asian carp out of the Great Lakes more than a decade ago because we saw a grave environmental danger. If a self-sustaining carp population became established in the Great Lakes, it would devastate native fish and recreational opportunities.

What We Are Doing »

An illustration portriat of the “As Above, So Below” 2016 Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Featuring Trimble Gilbert of Arctic Village

“As Above, So Below” 2016 Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Featuring Trimble Gilbert of Arctic Village. Credit: Drawing by Lindsay Carron

Portraits of Alaska

May 20, 2020

An artist in residence with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows her intimate bond with Alaska Native people on national wildlife refuges through her striking drawings.

Story »