Working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

What's going on at FWS

With more than 560 National Wildlife Refuges, 70 national fish hatcheries, numerous regional and field offices across the country and thousands of active conservation projects, our 8,400+ employees of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service have a lot going on. Here are a few of the latest news stories from across the Service...

an orange butterfly on a purple flower
Interior Department Commits to Urgent Actions to Conserve the Monarch Butterfly
Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland, Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Shannon Estenoz, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Director Martha Williams and Senator Jeff Merkley joined science experts and policymakers at the first-ever Monarch Butterfly Summit in Washington, DC, on...
Fish Surveys at Baca National Wildlife Refuge
Endangered Species Act
Rescind Regulatory Definition of “Habitat” Under the Endangered Species Act
To better fulfill the conservation purposes of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service (together the “Services”) will rescind a final rule, published in December 2020, which established a regulatory definition of “habitat”...
sunbeams coming through clouds over sagebrush lands in Colorado
Habitat Restoration
Bipartisan Infrastructure Law to Fund Sagebrush Projects in the West
Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland announced that the Biden-Harris administration will invest more than $9 million in fiscal year 2022 Bipartisan Infrastructure Law funds to support projects to restore and conserve strategic areas within the sagebrush ecosystem.
Oregon semaphore grass at one of the natural population sites
Habitat Restoration
The Burns Paiute Tribe and the Rarest Grass in Oregon
On an October morning in 2021, three Burns Paiute Tribe wildlife program staff, one USDA-Agricultural Research Service ecologist, eight volunteers organized by Portland Audubon, and one U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service archaeologist arrived at the mountain meadows of Logan Valley with shovels,...
birds in an orange sky
Recreation
Service Promotes Public Access to Hunting and Fishing
Continuing the Biden-Harris Administration’s efforts to increase recreational access on public lands, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced new proposed hunting and fishing opportunities for game species at 19 national wildlife refuges on approximately 54,000 acres nationwide.
A graphic of light blue waves on a blue background
Wildlife Management
Department of the Interior Proposes Proposes Expanding Conservation Technique as Climate Change Threatens Greater Species Extinction
In the first Endangered Species Act (ESA) interpretive rule produced under the Biden-Harris administration, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to revise section 10(j) regulations under the ESA to better facilitate recovery by allowing for the introduction of listed species to suitable...

Our Focus

The history of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service can be traced back to 1871. We are the only federal government agency whose primary responsibility is to manage fish and wildlife resources in the public trust for people today and future generations. Here are just a few of our focus areas...

What We Do For You

If you’re looking for places to experience nature; interested in partnering with us; seeking technical advice, permits, grants, data or scientific research; want to know more about today’s conservation challenges; looking for ways on how you can get involved and make a difference -- the Service has a lot to offer and more…

Visit Us - Our Locations

With more than 560 national wildlife refuges, dozens of national fish hatcheries and more than 100 field offices, there are numerous great U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service locations to visit.