link to fws.gov homepage
Conserving the Nature of America
Two of the endangered Okaloosa darter spawns in fine leafted aquatic plants
The Latino Engagement Program has helped bring in a more diverse audience to events such as Winter Wildlife Field Day at the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuges. Credit: Samantha Bartling/USFWS

Willamette Valley Refuges Focus on Reaching All Audiences

November 24, 2021

More than 320,000 visitors annually come to the three refuges in the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex — Baskett Slough, Ankeny and William L. Finley — in western Oregon. Since 2015, the refuges have been working to attract people of Latino heritage, about 25% of the population in the communities around the refuges.

Leading a Culture Change »


Two of the endangered Okaloosa darter spawns in fine leafted aquatic plants
A hunter takes aim. Credit: Tina Shaw/USFWS

Refuge in Illinois Welcomes Hunters With Disabilities

November 17, 2021

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service know that hunters of all backgrounds and abilities deserve access to quality hunting opportunities at America’s national wildlife refuges and other protected lands. We are proud to work with our state partners and other conservation organizations to provide hunting opportunities for all by hosting events for hunters with mobility, vision and other physical challenges.

Hunters Came From 10 States »


Two of the endangered Okaloosa darter spawns in fine leafted aquatic plants.
The Okaloosa darter inhabits six stream systems in Walton and Okaloosa counties in Florida. Credit: Noel Burkhead/Creative Commons

Air Force Recovers Okaloosa Darter

November 16, 2021

After years of conservation efforts by the U.S. Air Force, the Okaloosa darter has made a remarkable recovery. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that this small fish, found solely in two counties in Florida, no longer faces the threat of extinction and does not need listing under the Endangered Species Act.

News Release »