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Conserving the Nature of America
A black-capped chickadee perches on a branch.
A black-capped chickadee perches on a branch. Credit: David Ellis/USFWS

Where are the Winter Birds?

January 16, 2020

Have you noticed that the number of birds visiting your yard each winter seems to fluctuate year to year? Some years it may seem that you have an abundance of birds, making it difficult to keep feeders stocked, while other years seem much more manageable. What you might be experiencing is called an irruption – a sharp, irregular movement of birds to an area where they aren’t normally found. While this may seem unusual, it’s more common than you might think.

A Wide Variety of Birds Can Have Irruptions »


CalFire and US Fish & Wildlife Service Engine 58 crew implement a progressive hoselay to protect the community of Spring Valley from the Jamacha Fire burning on the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge.

Service Employees Work with Partners to Combat Fire at the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Blaine Inglis/USFWS

Service Employees Fight Wildfires at Home and Abroad

January 08, 2020

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fire management professionals work tirelessly to rapidly extinguish wildfires throughout the National Wildlife Refuge System. In 2019, Service staff committed over 155,000 hours to wildland fire response and all-hazard risk management, treating 183,000 acres for hazardous fuels reduction through prescribed fire and mechanical treatments. The Service also continues to support ongoing efforts to combat the catastrophic wildfires in Australia. Since December, seven Service firefighters have deployed along with more than 140 from other Department of the Interior bureaus and the U.S. Forest Service.

News Release »

Group photo of four members of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., hugging buy the shoreline at Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge in Connecticut.

Members of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., commemorate a visit to Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge in Connecticut.

Try Nature. It’s Good for You.

January 02, 2020

Getting outdoors in nature — on national wildlife refuges, for example — can improve your peace of mind and physical well-being. Many refuges are working with their communities to strengthen that health-and-nature connection.

Learn More »