Working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

What's going on at FWS

With more than 560 National Wildlife Refuges, 70 national fish hatcheries, numerous regional and field offices across the country and thousands of active conservation projects, our 8,400+ employees of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service have a lot going on. Here are a few of the latest news stories from across the Service...

Two California condors in a flight pen perching with their wings outstretched. Another condor can be seen in the background.
Our Partners
Working with Tribes
One of our top priorities is working together with those who have stewarded the country’s lands and wildlife since time immemorial. Native American Tribes have long dedicated themselves to management and conservation of fish, wildlife, and their habitats. Read about a few of the projects were we...
Close up of a small spotted brown and black toad on blades of brown and green grass.
Endangered Species Act
Service lists Dixie Valley toad, found only in Nevada, as endangered
Following a review of the best available scientific information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined the Dixie Valley toad is at risk of extinction and is listing the species as endangered under the Endangered Species Act, continuing the protections applied to the toad in the...
A plant with white and pink flowers
Endangered Species Act
Two Channel Islands plant species reach recovery thanks to Endangered Species Act
Ventura, Calif. - Two plants that live on California’s Channel Islands and nowhere else on earth – the Santa Cruz Island dudleya and island bedstraw – have reached recovery thanks to Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proposing to remove the...
Northern long-eared bat with white-nose syndrome in a cave
Endangered Species Act
Northern long-eared bat reclassified as endangered under the Endangered Species Act
The bat, listed as threatened in 2015, now faces extinction due to the rangewide impacts of white-nose syndrome, a deadly disease affecting hibernating bats across North America. The rule takes effect on January 30, 2023. The growing extinction crisis highlights the importance of the Endangered...
A rescued young alligator snapping turtle on a grassy field.
Wildlife Management
Critical Progress as CITES CoP19 Comes to a Close
After working around the clock for two weeks, the Biden-Harris administration announced it has forged critical agreements to ensure legal, traceable and biologically sustainable international trade of wild animals and plants.
Honeybees storing honey and pollen on an apiary frame
Bee thankful for pollinators
Who helps prepare your holiday meals? Do they have wings, antennae and six legs? If you’re eating apple pie, cranberry sauce and other common dishes, they do! By helping plants reproduce, bees and other pollinators make our special dinners possible. Meet a few of these busy bees in this article.

Our Focus

The history of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service can be traced back to 1871. We are the only federal government agency whose primary responsibility is to manage fish and wildlife resources in the public trust for people today and future generations. Here are just a few of our focus areas...

What We Do For You

If you’re looking for places to experience nature; interested in partnering with us; seeking technical advice, permits, grants, data or scientific research; want to know more about today’s conservation challenges; looking for ways on how you can get involved and make a difference -- the Service has a lot to offer and more…

Visit Us - Our Locations

With more than 560 national wildlife refuges, dozens of national fish hatcheries and more than 100 field offices, there are numerous great U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service locations to visit.