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Conserving the Nature of America


Carolyn Read looks towards the freshly translocated coastal sage scrub plants in the restoration area on her property.
Carolyn Read looks towards the freshly translocated coastal sage scrub plants in the restoration area on her property. Credit: Jonathan Snapp-Cook/USFWS.

Nature's Good Neighbors: Berry Grower Embraces Conservation, History

May 18, 2018
San Marcos, California, ranch owner Carolyn Read, 86, runs a ranch that started in the 1800s and faces increasing development pressure from sprawling San Diego. Determined to keep her land working and wild, Read is the only non-commercial boysenberry producer in Southern California. She’s worked with the Service to restore some of her property for pollinators and native birds.
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Nature's Good Neighbors Stories »
A group of six teenage kids wearing orange shirts with a USFWS Federal Wildlfe Officer in the woods.
Federal Wildlife Officer Ashley Uphoff teaches orienteering. Credit: Joshua Bauer/USFWS.

Tools of the Trade: Kids Get Hands-n Experience Learning to Solve Wildlife Crime

May 17, 2018
What do federal wildlife officers do everyday? Like all law enforcement professionals, they serve and protect, but there’s more to the story. Learn about what federal wildlife officers in the Midwest Region are doing to inspire the next generation of women and men who protect America's National Wildlife Refuge System.
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Flowering Tobusch fishhook cactus, found only on the Edwards Plateau of Central Texas. Credit: Chris Best/USFWS
Florida panther kittens are nestled in their den near Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: David Shindle /Florida FWCC

Partnerships Put Once Near-Extinct Texas Cactus on Path to Recovery

May 15, 2018

Thanks to a slew of partnerships among the Service, Texas agencies and local stakeholders, the Service downlisted the Tobusch fishhook cactus from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act. When listed under the ESA in 1979, fewer than 200 plants were known to exist. Today more than 3,300 cacti have been documented. This action brings this plant, once on the brink of extinction, one step closer to the ultimate ESA goal, full recovery and delisting.
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