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Conserving the Nature of America
A green jay standing on a tree branch. Come visit a national wildlife refuge to explore the wonderful birds and their natural habitat during your visit.
A green jay at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge in Texas. Credit: Mike Carlo / USFWS

Wildlife Refuges: Where the Birds Are

February 22, 2017

Some people gladly awaken at 4 a.m. and drive hours to glimpse a rare Kirtland's warbler. Other people barely know a robin from a bald eagle, but they love to walk outdoors. For both types – experienced birders and newbies alike – national wildlife refuges are wonderful places to see birds in natural habitat.
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Wisdom checks in with her newest chick. Credit: Naomi Blinick / USFWS Volunteer
Wisdom checks in with her newest chick. Credit: Naomi Blinick / USFWS Volunteer

Wisdom, the World’s Oldest Known Wild Bird, Has a New Chick

February 14, 2017
On a remote atoll in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, Laysan albatross Wisdom just became a mother again. Last December, volunteers and staff at Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Memorial documented that Wisdom, at least 66, had returned to the atoll and was incubating an egg with her mate. About two months later, word came from Midway, Wisdom had hatched another chick!
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Monarch butterflies overwintering near Santa Barbara, Calif. Credit: Lisa Hupp / USFWS
Monarch butterflies overwintering near Santa Barbara, Calif. Credit: Lisa Hupp / USFWS

Monarchs Still Need Your Help

February 14, 2017
Conservation efforts count now more than ever for monarch butterflies. The eastern population of monarchs overwintering in Mexico continues to decline due to severe storms and habitat loss. Numbers also were down at historically large sites for populations of western monarchs. From entire nations to individuals, everyone can play a role in helping reverse these declines.
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