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Conserving the Nature of America
Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery staff and partners work before the sun comes up to safely load and transfer 348,000 young spring Chinook salmon.
Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery staff and partners work before the sun comes up to safely load and transfer 348,000 young spring Chinook salmon during the extreme heatwave that hit the Pacific Northwest in late June. Credit: Katie Royer/USFWS

Service, Tribal Partners Work Together to Save Salmon from Extreme Heat

July 28, 2021

Despite late June’s hazardous heat at Columbia River Gorge National Fish Hatcheries in the Pacific Northwest, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff and partners at the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and the Yakama Nation worked together to safely transfer 348,000 spring Chinook salmon to a hatchery with cooler water, and release 7.15 million juvenile upriver bright fall Chinook salmon eight days ahead of schedule so they could reach the Pacific Ocean before river temperature hit the danger range.

Ready for the Challenge »


Participants in the July 27 Walk of Sorrow to Hope include (rear, left) Edgar Timmons rear), Mary McIntosh, Johnnie Timmons, Darrell Dunham, Tyrone Timmons, (front left) Margaret Ann Timmons Finley and Fran Timmons.
A walk starting at the entrance to Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge on Tuesday commemorates the 79th anniversary of the day the federal government took the land now comprising the refuge and used it for a World War II airfield. Credit: Mark Davis/USFWS

Service, Refuge Descendants Highlight Connection, Community

July 26, 2021

A community in Georgia forced off land that later became Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge is holding a three-day observance this week stressing the community’s connection to the area. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has entered into a partnership with the descendants of the community to amplify the voices of those who lived on the land before it was a refuge. 

Walking for Unity »

FWS employee, Juliette Gutierrez Fernandez and her Aunt Estella.
Juliette Gutierrez Fernandez and her Aunt Estella at Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge. Credit: Juliette Gutierrez Fernandez

The Nature of Family

July 22, 2021

Conservation heroes are all around us, writes Juliette Gutierrez Fernandez, project leader at Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Complex in southwestern Washington. Rachel Carson certainly is one of them, but so is the aunt who joined her in outdoor wandering and inspired her conservation career. Juliette's experiences drive her to reach out to the Hispanic community, go back to schools she attended as a child, share experiences, and provide opportunities.  

One Path to Conservation »
Latino Conservation Week »