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Conserving the Nature of America

PLEASE NOTE: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has received Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests for information related to the import and export of wildlife specimens and flora into and out of the United States contained in the Law Enforcement Management Information System (LEMIS) database. Information contained in LEMIS comes from data collected on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Declaration for Importation or Exportation of Fish and Wildlife (Form 3-177). The Service has prepared a notice to provide businesses (submitters) who have submitted information on Form 3-177 with an opportunity to review the information subject to potential disclosure under the FOIA and object to such disclosure. Click the links below to review the Notice and read instructions on how to object. All objections are due by June 1, 2021.

Notice link: https://www.fws.gov/irm/bpim/foia.html

Notice (PDF): https://www.fws.gov/irm/bpim/docs/Wildlife_Flora_Import_and_Export_Data_stored_in_LEMIS.pdf


A female bighorn sheep watches hikers pass by from Point of Rocks on Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, west of Las Vegas.
A female bighorn sheep watches hikers pass by from Point of Rocks on Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, west of Las Vegas. Credit: Karen Dorn/USFWS

Decades of Wildlife Restoration Funding Help Recover Nevada’s Bighorn Sheep

May 13, 2021

Since the 1960s, biologists in the United States and Canada have worked to recover bighorn sheep, which nearly vanished across western landscapes due to degraded habitat, unregulated hunting, human disturbances, and disease transmission from domestic sheep. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Wildlife Restoration Program, which provides funds from excise taxes on firearms, ammunition, and archery equipment to states, has played a large role in the recovery effort in Nevada, which boasts a population of over 11,000 bighorn sheep, up from just 2,000 when recovery and management efforts began.

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Girl posing with her fish pole and the fish she caught.
The white-crowned sparrow is one of the more than 1,000 migratory birds protected under the MBTA. Credit: Tom Koerner/USFWS

Interior Department Takes Steps to Revoke Final Rule on Migratory Bird Treaty Act Incidental Take

May 06, 2021

Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a proposed rule to revoke the January 7, 2021, final regulation that limited the scope of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). Significant concerns about the interpretation of the MBTA have been raised by the public, legal challenges in court and from the international treaty partners. The MBTA is a bedrock environmental law that is critical to protecting migratory birds and restoring declining bird populations. A 30-day comment period will be open beginning May 7 through June 7, 2021.

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Girl posing with her fish pole and the fish she caught.
Fishing at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Credit: Sean Benninger/USFWS

Service Promotes Public Access to Hunting and Fishing in Largest Expansion of Opportunities to Date

May 04, 2021

Continuing the Department of the Interior’s efforts to increase recreational access on public lands, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today a proposal for new or expanded hunting and sport fishing opportunities for game species across 2.1 million acres at 90 national wildlife refuges and on the lands of one national fish hatchery.

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