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Conserving the Nature of America
Pangolins, or scaly anteaters, are covered with overlapping scales made of keratin, the same protein that forms human hair and finger nails. Credit: Tikki Hywood Trust
Pangolins, or scaly anteaters, are covered with overlapping scales made of keratin, the same protein that forms human hair and finger nails. Credit: Tikki Hywood Trust

The Fight Against Wildlife Trafficking

August 31, 2016
Wildlife trafficking—the illegal taking and trade in protected species and their parts—continues to grow, threatening the future of many species of wildlife. The United States plays a key role in wildlife trafficking, as both consumer and transit country and a source of organized criminal networks. But it is also in the vanguard of efforts to end wildlife trafficking. The Service takes a leadership role combating wildlife trafficking both here and abroad.
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Summer 2016 issue of Fish & Wildlife News »
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The waters around the islands and atolls of the northwestern Hawaiian chain – and the unique and abundant wildlife they support – will now receive broader protection thanks to the expansion of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Credit: James Watt
The waters around the islands and atolls of the northwestern Hawaiian chain – and the unique and abundant wildlife they support – will now receive broader protection thanks to the expansion of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Credit: James Watt

Expansion of Marine National Monument in Pacific by President Obama Creates World’s Largest Protected Area to be Co-Managed by Service

August 26, 2016
President Obama today announced the expansion of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument to become the world’s largest protected area. More than 582,000 square miles of coral reefs, seamounts and undersea ridges and their wildlife will be safeguarded, an area greater than the size of Texas, California and Montana combined. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service now manages nearly 1 billion acres of lands and waters for wildlife, the largest conservation estate on the planet.
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Paul Rauch. Credit: USFWS
Paul Rauch. Credit: USFWS

Paul Rauch to Lead Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration Program

August 24, 2016
Paul Rauch has been named the Service’s new Assistant Director for Wildlife and Sport Fish Restoration (WSFR). Rauch, a career Service employee of more than two decades, has served as WSFR’s Acting Assistant Director since April. Rauch will oversee grant programs that provide more than $1 billion annually to states, territories and federally recognized Indian tribes to support on-the-ground wildlife and fisheries conservation.
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