We're Hiring!!!

We are hiring 2 permanent WG-9 Engineering Equipment Operator (Fire) positions to join our team at MS Sandhill Crane NWR! Salary range is $25.64 - $29.94. Check out the job announcement below and apply no later than February 2, 2024. These positions are open to all United States citizens and U.S. nationals under announcement R4-24-12267641-WA-FDHA.

All applications for these positions must be submitted through the USA Jobs website at https://www.usajobs.gov/job/771834400

Any questions regarding these positions should be directed to the Human Resource Office via email at fwshiring@fws.gov. Please do not send applications, resumes or questions to our refuge website or Facebook page. All inquiries must to submitted to the website above and should reference announcement R4-24-12267641-WA-FDHA.

Look in any direction at Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge and you look back to an earlier time along the Gulf Coast. The landscape is flat, like a prairie. The ground, blanketed with impervious clay soil, is waterlogged and acidic. Yet here, a rich, colorful blend of rare orchids, carnivorous plants and other ground cover thrive under the scattered pines in one of the most species-rich plant communities in North America. This is the wet pine savanna ecosystem – the critical habitat for endangered Mississippi sandhill cranes, migratory songbirds and waterfowl, and many other wildlife species. The refuge protects and restores the last remaining wet pine savanna in the United States, and thus, ensures the survival of the rare and magnificent Mississippi sandhill crane.
We're Hiring!!!!

We are hiring 2 permanent WG-9 Engineering Equipment Operator (Fire) positions to join our team at MS Sandhill Crane NWR! Salary range is $25.64 - $29.94. Check out the job announcement below and apply no later than February 9, 2024. These positions are open to all United States citizens and U.S. nationals under announcement R4-24-12267641-WA-FDHA.

All applications for these positions must be submitted through the USA Jobs website at https://www.usajobs.gov/job/771834400

Any questions regarding these positions should be directed to the Human Resource Office via email at fwshiring@fws.gov. Please do not send applications, resumes or questions to our refuge website or Facebook page. All inquiries must to submitted to the website above and should reference announcement R4-24-12267641-WA-FDHA.

Visit Us

National wildlife refuges offer us all a chance to unplug from the stresses of daily life and reconnect with our natural surroundings.

Stroll through some of the last remaining wet pine savannas for a chance to view one of the critically endangered Mississippi sandhill cranes. The refuge also offers outstanding birding opportunities as well as the chance to see other rare and fascinating species, from orchids to pitcher plants. View the interactive exhibits in the refuge Visitor Center and view a short film on the creation and purpose of the refuge. 

Location and Contact Information

      About Us

      The Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1975 under authority of the Endangered Species Act to protect the critically endangered Mississippi sandhill cranes and their unique, and itself endangered, wet pine savanna habitat.

      The crane population, at that time only 30-35 birds, is currently at approximately 130 birds. Through captive rearing and reintroduction to the area as well as wild birds nesting in the savannas, the crane population continues to grow.

      The refuge also protects and restores the last large expanses of wet pine savanna, primarily through the use of prescribed fire. The wet pine savanna is one of the most diverse ecosystems in the U.S. with more than 30 plants found in a square meter of land.

      What We Do

      Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge was established for the protection and recovery of it's namesake, the Mississippi sandhill crane, and the restoration of the endangered wet pine savanna habitat. By restoring the wet pine savanna, the refuge provides ideal habitat for the cranes as well as many other species native to the Gulf Coast region. By using habitat management tools, such as prescribed burns, tracking and monitoring, and reintroduction, the refuge works to preserve and protect this unique natural resource for present and future generations.

      Our Species

      A close-up of a critically endangered dusky gopher frog.

      The refuge was established in 1975 under authority of the Endangered Species Act to protect the critically endangered Mississippi sandhill cranes and their unique, and itself endangered, wet pine savanna habitat.

      The crane population, at that time only 30-35 birds, is currently at approximately 120 birds. Through captive rearing and reintroduction to the area as well as wild birds nesting in the savannas, the crane population continues to grow.

      The refuge also protects and restores the last large expanses of wet pine savanna, primarily through the use of prescribed fire. The wet pine savanna is one of the most diverse ecosystems in the U.S. with more than 30 plants found in a square meter of land.

      Mississippi sandhill cranes resemble great blue herons (Ardea herodias). A major distinguishing characteristic is that cranes are completely gray. Great blue herons usually have white on their heads and dark colored underparts. When standing erect, cranes are about 4 feet tall. Male and female...
      FWS Focus

      Get Involved

      Whether you want to further conservation, learn more about nature or share your love of the outdoors, you’ve come to the right place. National wildlife refuges provide many opportunities for you to help your community and fish and wildlife by doing what you love