Before you begin: 

Ecological Services has two field offices in North Carolina. This guide is only valid for the following North Carolina counties: Alamance, Beaufort, Bertie, Bladen, Brunswick, Camden, Carteret, Caswell, Chatham, Chowan, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Currituck, Dare, Duplin, Durham, Edgecombe, Franklin, Gates, Granville, Greene, Guilford, Halifax, Harnett, Hertford, Hoke, Hyde, Johnston, Jones, Lee, Lenoir, Martin, Montgomery, Moore, Nash, New Hanover, Northampton, Onslow, Orange, Pamlico, Pasquotank, Pender, Perquimans, Person, Pitt,  Randolph, Richmond, Robeson, Rockingham, Sampson, Scotland, Tyrrell, Vance, Wake, Warren, Washington, Wayne, Wilson.  For other North Carolina counties, contact the Asheville Field Office.                  

Consultations

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) directs all Federal agencies to work to conserve endangered and threatened species and to use their authorities to further the purposes of the Act. Section 7 Section 7
Section 7 Consultation The Endangered Species Act (ESA) directs all Federal agencies to work to conserve endangered and threatened species and to use their authorities to further the purposes of the Act. Section 7 of the Act, called "Interagency Cooperation," is the mechanism by which Federal…

Learn more about Section 7
of the Act, called "Interagency Cooperation," is the mechanism by which Federal agencies ensure the actions they take, fund or authorize, do not jeopardize the existence of listed species
.

Industry-specific

Process Overview

This online project review process is intended for use by landowners, applicants, consultants, agency personnel, and any other individual or entity requiring U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) review or approval of their project within eastern and central North Carolina. You should complete this online process before contacting our office.

The end goal is for users to make quick and accurate determinations to ensure that trust resources are considered and conserved while planning and conducting development activities.

speciesconclusiontable

Species Conclusion Table helps users make quick and accurate determinations to ensure that trust resources are considered and conserved while planning and conducting development activities in eastern and central North Carolina. 

Follow this step-by-step guidance to identify:

  1. Threatened and endangered species
  2. Designated critical habitat
  3. Other Federal trust resources that may be affected by your project.

 

Record important information and your determination in this Species Conclusions Table as you complete each step.

If, upon completion of this process, you determine that your project has no effect or is not likely to adversely affect these resources, you can certify your determination, and no further coordination will be required. You will need to send us your results and maintain a complete copy to document your compliance. For non-Federal applicants, you will need to send us your results and maintain a complete copy to document your compliance. If your project may affect and is likely to adversely affect important resources, the review package developed through the process will expedite further review when it is submitted to our office.

Because the website and information are frequently updated to provide new trust resource information and methods to review projects, refer to the website frequently to ensure that current information is utilized.

Quick Links to Forms:  

Step 1. Action Area

Determine the action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area
of the proposed project as instructed below. This action area will be drawn in Step 2 using the Service's Information, Planning and Consultation System ( IPaC IPaC
Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) is a project planning tool that streamlines the USFWS environmental review process

Learn more about IPaC
). Failure to correctly define the action area as instructed will result in incorrect outcomes and may not comply with the ESA.

The action area is defined by regulation as all areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action (50 CFR §402.02). This analysis is not limited to the "footprint" of the action nor is it limited by the Federal agency's authority.

To determine the action area, mark the project footprint on a topographic map. Identify the range of impacts such as:

  • Ground disturbance (including access roads),
  • Changes in water quality and quantity (both surface and underground water)
  • Air quality
  • Lighting effects
  • Noise disturbance

Draw a line around all the affected areas. This is the action area.

Step 2. Official Resource List

Use the Service's Information, Planning and Consultation system ( IPaC IPaC
Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) is a project planning tool that streamlines the USFWS environmental review process

Learn more about IPaC
)
(https://ecos.fws.gov/ipac/to determine if any listed, proposed or candidate species may be present in the action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area
. Follow the directions in IPaC to enter your project location and generate a species list. After selecting the appropriate project type, request a Resource List. The Official Resources List will include all federally-listed threatened, endangered, or candidate species that may occur in the vicinity of the action area and includes a map of the action area. IPaC will also identify, migratory bird habitat, National Wildlife Refuges, hatcheries, and wetlands in the vicinity of your action area. Print the PDF version of this Official Resources List and add it to your project review package. After completing the steps in IPaC, exit that website and continue below.

(A). If the Official Species List species list indicates there are no listed, proposed or candidate species found in the action area, add "ESA listed species" to your species conclusions table (MS Word Format) (PDF), and put "species not present" in the conclusion column in the species conclusions table. Continue to Step 5. Until the proposed project is implemented, check IPaC every 90 days to ensure that listed, proposed or candidate species information for the action area is current. If any changes to the species list occur, you must complete this process for the newly identified species.

(B). If the Official Species List indicates listed, proposed or candidate species may be present in the action area, add all of the species on the list to the species conclusions table (MS Word Format) (PDF), and continue to Step 3.

NOTE: Proposed species are any species of fish, wildlife or plant that is proposed in the Federal Register to be listed under section 4 of the ESA. Candidate species are species of fish, wildlife, or plants for which the Service has sufficient information to propose them as endangered or threatened under the ESA, but for which development of a proposed listing regulation is precluded by other higher priority listing activities. The Service encourages consideration of these species in the environmental review process by avoiding adverse impacts to these species. Until they are proposed for listing, candidate species are not legally protected pursuant to the ESA, therefore any actions undertaken to avoid impacts or provide protection for these species are voluntary.

Step 3 - State Coordination 

Determine whether a documented occurrence of any listed, proposed or candidate species is within the action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area
by contacting the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program (NCNHP); the agency maintains a database and has differing expertise and/or regulatory responsibility. Add any NCNHP documentation to the project review package.  Note that NCNHP often does not have data on private lands.  A lack of documented species by NCNHP does not provide assurance that the species is absent from the Action Area. 

(A) If the agency provides documentation that a federally listed, proposed or candidate species is present within the action area, add "species present" under the conclusion column for the appropriate species on the species conclusions table. If the conclusion for all species on your list is "species present," go to Step 5. Otherwise, continue to Step 4

(B) If there are no documented occurrences of a federally listed, proposed or candidate species within the action area and/or the State agencies do not mention a species on your list, leave the conclusions column blank in the species conclusions table and continue to Step 4. 

Link to Search: https://ncnhde.natureserve.org/ 

Step 4. Suitable Habitat

 

Determine whether listed/proposed/candidate species may occur based on the habitat present within the action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area
for each species on the species conclusions table. Review the species information provided in IPaC IPaC
Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) is a project planning tool that streamlines the USFWS environmental review process

Learn more about IPaC
, and the information provided by NCNHP, and any other sources of information (e.g., habitat assessments) available to determine whether the action area contains suitable habitat for each species. Habitat assessments/surveys must be conducted by a qualified professional. Refer to the
Optimal Survey Times for Plants for additional guidance. Surveys are valid for a certain period of time based on the species' life history. If your existing survey is no longer valid or the survey does not include the entire action area, obtain a new survey. Handling or researching endangered plants or animals is a regulated activity. If you need a new survey, hire a qualified biologist to conduct the work. State and federal permits may be required for certain species. You can learn about the special license and permits available by visiting the NC Wildlife Resources Commission's (NCWRC) website. If you have questions, write to the NCWRC's Regulated Activities Permit Section at RAPS@ncwildlife.org or call them at 919-707-0061.

 

(A) If you can confirm suitable habitat is absent within the action area, add "no suitable habitat present" to the conclusion column in the species conclusions table for the appropriate species, and document what source(s) of information you consulted and why you reached that conclusion in the notes/documentation column of the species conclusions table. Add this documentation to your project review package.

(B) If there may be suitable habitat for a listed/proposed/candidate species or if you are uncertain about whether the habitat types may support any listed/proposed/candidate species, a detailed habitat assessment is recommended. If the habitat assessment concludes suitable habitat is absent, add "no suitable habitat present" to the conclusion column in the species conclusions table for the appropriate species, and include why you reached that conclusion in the notes/documentation column of the species conclusions table. Add the habitat assessment to the project review package.

(C) If suitable habitat occurs within the action area, species surveys are recommended. Surveys must be conducted by a qualified, permitted biologist, following the survey guidance for each species that may be present. 

If surveys indicate species are absent from the action area, add "suitable habitat present, species not present" to the conclusion column in the species conclusions table for the appropriate species. Add the survey report to the project review package.
If surveys document that a species is present, add "species present" to the conclusion column in the species conclusions table for the appropriate species. Add the survey report to the project review package.
(D) If surveys are not conducted and potential habitat occurs with action area, add "potential habitat present and no current survey conducted" to the conclusion column in the species conclusions table for the appropriate species.

Conclusions should be filled in for all species at this point. If there are species on your list without conclusions, return to Step 3 and continue through the review process until you have the appropriate conclusion for each species.  When all conclusions are complete, continue to Step 5

Step 5. Critical Habitat

Eight species have designated Critical Habitat in North Carolina:

Critical Habitat is proposed for Red Knot.

A Significant Number of Counties in Eastern North Carolina contain Federally Designated Critical Habitat.  Click on the link to the Critical Habitat Mapper and determine if your Action Area intersects with designated or proposed Critical Habitat.

Critical Habitat Mapper (https://fws.maps.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?webmap=9d8de5e265ad4fe09893cf75b8dbfb77)

(A) If the project action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area
intersects critical habitat, add "critical habitat" to the species/resource name column in the species conclusion table, and add to the conclusion column of the species conclusion table what species critical habitat is present, and continue to
Step 6.

(B) If the project action area does not occur within these counties, add "critical habitat" to the species/resource name column in the species conclusions table, and add “no critical habitat present” to the conclusion column in the species conclusions table, and continue to Step 6.

Step 6 - Eagle Protection

The bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is protected by the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act (Eagle Act (link to /node/1507). Follow the steps below to determine if an Eagle Act permit may be necessary. The Eagle Act protects both bald and golden eagles from take and disturbance. Under some circumstances the Eagle Act may allow take of bald and golden eagles with a permit. The bald eagle nesting (breeding) season in North Carolina is from December 1 through July 15. Determine if the action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area
intersects within a bald eagle nest buffer using the information gathered from the NC Natural Heritage Program in
Step 3.  A lack of data from NCNHP is not a guarantee that bald eagle nests are not present.  The project proponent should be familiar with the Action Area and whether potential nesting habitat is present for bald eagles (tall trees near a large waterbody).

If the action area is not within 660 feet of a bald eagle nest, add "bald eagle" to the species/resource name column and add "unlikely to disturb nesting bald eagles" to the conclusion column in the species conclusion table. Continue to Step 7.

If the action area is within 660 feet of a bald eagle nest, determine whether the proposed action may disturb the nesting eagle by following the steps in the Service's Region 4 bald eagle management guidelines and conservation measures review process.

For projects that have blasting or other loud noise components, the buffer distance around eagle nests is 2,640 feet or up to 5,280 feet in open areas. Refer to the National Bald Eagle Management Guidelines (link to: /media/158271) and the Population demographics and estimation of sustainable take in the United States 2016 update

(A) If you are able to implement the recommendations in the guidelines, add "bald eagle" to the species/resource name column and add "unlikely to disturb nesting bald eagles" to the conclusion column in the species conclusions table. Document recommendations you adopted to avoid disturbance in the notes/documentation column of the species conclusions table, and add any additional documents/documentation to the project review package. Continue to Step 7.

(B) If you are unable to implement the recommendations in the guidelines, add "bald eagle" to the species/resource name column and add "may disturb nesting bald eagles" to the conclusion column in the species conclusions table. Provide an explanation of why the recommendations cannot be implemented in the notes/documentation column of the species conclusions table and add this to the project review package. Continue to Step 7.

Step 7. Northern long-eared bat (NLEB)  

The Service implemented a special rule under section 4(d) of the ESA providing flexibility to those working in northern long-eared bat habitat. Under the 4(d) rule:

All intentional take is prohibited, except:

  • Defense of human life (includes for public health monitoring)
  • Removal of hazardous trees for protection of human life and property
  • Removal of bats from human structures (check with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission to ensure compliance with state wildlife laws)

Incidental take without a permit is prohibited:

  • Within hibernation sites (includes disturbing or disrupting hibernating individuals and alternation of hibernation habitat, including cave or mine entrance, when bats are not present)
  • Within ¼ mile of a known hibernation site
  • Within a 150-foot radius of a known, occupied maternity roost during the pup season (June 1- July 31)

Eastern North Carolina areas where incidental take may be a special consideration:

According to our records, NLEB is known to be present in the green counties highlighted in the map. Some of these counties, listed below the map, also contain known roost trees for NLEB.   The counties listed below contain known roost trees and may be subject to restrictions related to maternity roosting sites

Counties with known roosting sites in NC:

Please review the following bullets to determine applicability:

  • For NCDOT projects within NCDOT Divisions 1-8, the following guidance does not apply.  The effects of NCDOT projects in these divisions on the NLEB have been addressed through a Programmatic Biological Opinion issued jointly to the Federal Highway Administration and the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), which took effect on May 4, 2015. 
  • The Wilmington District Corps and the Asheville and Raleigh USFWS offices have developed a Standard Local Operating Procedures (SLOPES) for Corps project managers to follow when determining effects to NLEB. If you were directed to this website via the Nationwide Permit (NWP) Regional Conditions, a Regional General Permit (RGP) condition, or the SLOPES, then use the Red HUC maps to determine if your project is located within a red HUC or within 0.25 miles of a red HUC. Once you have determined this, return to the NWP or RGP condition and continue to follow those directions.
  • For all other development and conservation projects, please follow the guidance below.

 

 

All development and conservation projects or actions

If you are NOT CONDUCTING any of the following types of activities, then your determination is “No Effect:”

  • Tree cutting or removal (any size)
  • Percussive activities (e.g., blasting, pile driving)
  • Constructing or operating wind turbines
  • Bridge removal or maintenance
  • Prescribed burning
  • Removal of bats from structures

If NLEB is the only species on your official species list and you are not conducting any of the activities listed above, then you do not need to contact the Service.

Example of Species Conclusion Table for a "No Effect" determination.

Species/Resource Name

Conclusion

ESA Section 7 Section 7
Section 7 Consultation The Endangered Species Act (ESA) directs all Federal agencies to work to conserve endangered and threatened species and to use their authorities to further the purposes of the Act. Section 7 of the Act, called "Interagency Cooperation," is the mechanism by which Federal…

Learn more about Section 7

Eagle Act Determination

Note/ Documentation

Northern long-eared bat  Suitable habitat present but no trees will be cut/removed OR Suitable habitat not present (no trees)  No effect  No tree cutting or removal 

Continue to Step 8 if you have made a "No Effect" determination.

Non-Federal actions that may affect NLEB

Projects located entirely inside the grey shaded counties, or outside of the red highlighted areas on the county maps above do not require prohibited intentional take and meet the criteria for the 4(d) rule exemption. Is your project within a red highlighted area in one of the Red HUC maps above?
 

If No and NLEB is the only species on your official species list, you do not need to contact the Service.

Species/Resource Name 

Conclusion 

ESA Section 7/ Eagle Act Determination 

Note/Documentation 

Northern long-eared bat  Suitable habitat present  May affect Relying upon the findings of the 1/5/2016 Programmatic Biological Opinion for Final 4(d) Rule on the Northern Long-Eared Bat and Activities Excepted from Take Prohibitions to fulfill our project-specific section 7 responsibilities. 

If yes, submit your project in Step 10 (via the Review Request Letter) for further review.

Example of Species Conclusions Table:

Species/Resource Name 

Conclusion 

ESA Section 7/Eagle Act Determination 

Note/Documentation 

Northern long-eared bat  A documented maternity colony or hibernacula may be in the action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area
 
May affect  Project is located within a Red HUC.

The Service will review your project and advise if an incidental take permit is required.
Continue to Step 8

Federal agencies (other than U.S. Army Corps of Engineers*)

Determine if your action area intersects with an area where incidental take is not allowed under the final 4(d) rule. Projects located entirely outside of the red highlighted areas on the Red HUC maps, and projects that do not require prohibited intentional take (see above), meet the criteria for the 4(d) rule exemption. Any associated take is therefore exempt, and it is not necessary to wait 30 days for the Service to object or concur. Unless you or your agency has a surrogate consultation procedure in place with the Service, please complete this consultation  form (pdf, 66 KB). Federal agencies should use this form for the optional streamlined consultation framework for the NLEB.

(*The Wilmington District Corps of Engineers has developed standard local operating procedures in consultation with the Service and will follow those procedures.)

The consultation form is not necessary if an action agency determines that a proposed action will have no effect on the NLEB.

Will you be relying upon the findings the 1/5/2016 Programmatic Biological Opinion on Final 4(d) rule for the Northern Long-Eared Bat and Activities Excepted from Take Prohibitions to fulfill your project-specific section 7 responsibilities?

If no: Submit your project (via the Review Request Letter) for further review.

Example of Species Conclusions Table:

Species/Resource Name 

Conclusion 

ESA Section 7/Eagle Act Determination 

Note/Documentation 

Northern long-eared bat  A documented maternity colony or hibernacula may be in the action area  May affect   

 

The Service will review your project and advise if future consultation is required.   

If yes: submit a Self-Certification letter. Use the example below to assist you in filling out the Species Conclusions Table.

The programmatic biological opinion requires federal agencies provide us written notification of their section 7 determination for the NLEB (project submittal) at least 30 days in advance of funding, authorizing, or carrying out an action. The federal agency must provide its determination as part of coordination/consultation for other listed species. Also include the number of acres of habitat impacted and how it will be impacted (e.g., trees clearing, prescribed fire, install wind turbines). The Service is not required to provide concurrence on your NLEB section 7 determination. If the Service does not respond within 30 days, the Federal agency may presume its determination is informed by best available information and consider its project responsibilities under section 7(a)(2) with respect to NLEB fulfilled through the programmatic biological opinion.

Example of Species Conclusions Table:

Species/Resource Name 

Conclusion 

ESA Section 7/Eagle Act Determination 

Note/Documentation 

Northern long-eared bat  Suitable habitat present  May affect  Relying upon the findings of the 1/5/2016 Programmatic Biological Opinion for Final 4(d) Rule on the Northern Long-Eared Bat and Activities Excepted from Take Prohibitions to fulfill our project-specific section 7 responsibilities.

Continue to Step 8

Step 8. Red-cockaded woodpecker – Sandhills Only  

If your project is not located in the Sandhills Ecoregion, continue to Step 9.   

The NC Sandhills RCW Online Project Review Process is intended for use by landowners, applicants, and consultants in the Sandhills of North Carolina, who are seeking USFWS review or approval of their project with respect to impacts to red-cockaded woodpecker (RCW).

*For properties within Forest Creek Golf Course or Pinehurst National #9, please continue to use the established process for those areas.

Frequently Asked Questions about the NC Sandhills RCW Online Project Review Process [link].

Instructions for Online Project Review for the NC Sandhills:

A. RCW Mapping:

Consult the NC Sandhills RCW Color-Coded Maps to determine where your property/project falls (Red Zone or Clear (no color)).  If in a Clear Zone AND RCW is the only species of concern for your project, Print Letter #1, retain the letter for your records and submit a copy of the letter to the Service at Raleigh@fws.gov for this certification to be valid. If you have made determinations for other species in the Action Area, include a copy of Letter #1 in your project review package and go to Step 9. If in a Red Zone, move on to Step 2.

B. Project Information:

  • Gather information for your project (site plans, project plans, methods, RCW survey information, tree survey information).
  • Fill in and print Project Review Request Letter #2 and submit the letter with a project review package to USFWS as instructed in Step 10.
  • Refer to these documents for survey protocol and instructions to determine Foraging Habitat Availability.

C. Submit Project Review Package (as applicable)

Add the RCW information and completed Project Review Request Letter #2 to your project review package.

Step 9. Determination

The conclusion column in your species conclusion table should now be filled in for all species/resources. Use Tables 1 and 2 below to assist you in completing the determination column in your species conclusions table. These tables show all the possible conclusions for each species/resource, and the resulting ESA Section 7 Section 7
Section 7 Consultation The Endangered Species Act (ESA) directs all Federal agencies to work to conserve endangered and threatened species and to use their authorities to further the purposes of the Act. Section 7 of the Act, called "Interagency Cooperation," is the mechanism by which Federal…

Learn more about Section 7
(Table 1) determination based on your conclusions. In addition, we have provided two examples of completed species conclusions tables below. If a "may affect" determination is made for a species/resources, please include all measures proposed to minimize or mitigate for potential impacts to each species or resources in the Notes/Documentation column. This will help you determine if a may affect determination is "likely to adversely affect" or "not likely to adversely affect" the species/resources” and assist the Service in our review of that determination. Use these tips to
avoid common determination flaws. Continue to Step 10.

ESA Section 7 Determination Table

Example of Species Conclusion 

ESA Section 7 Determination 

No suitable habitat present  No effect 
Suitable habitat present and surveys not conducted recently  May affect 
Species present  May affect 
Critical Habitat present  May affect 
Suitable habitat present, current surveys document absence of species  No effect OR May affect, not likely to adversely affect (SEE NOTE BELOW) 

NOTE:  If suitable habitat is present, but current surveys indicate the species is absent in the Action Area, the detection probability and likelihood of presence should be considered when making a determination.  For example, cryptic aquatic species can be very difficult to detect during surveys.  If habitat is suitable in the Action Area for listed or proposed aquatic species, the Service would recommend a determination of May Affect, Not Likely to Adversely Affect. For species that are more easily detected, if surveys were conducted by qualified, permitted biologists during the appropriate survey window, then a No Effect determination may be made.

Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act Determination

Possible Conclusions

Eagle Act Determination

Unlikely to disturb nesting bald eagles No Eagle Act Permit Required
Bald eagle nest within action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area
, may disturb nesting bald eagles
Eagle Act permit may be required
Bald eagle nests will be disturbed Eagle Act permit may be required

 

Step 10. Project Review Package 

Federal agencies 

Federal agencies are not required to contact the Service or provide documentation for "no effect" and/or "no Eagle Act permit required" determinations. For "may affect, not likely to adversely affect" determinations, federal agencies are required to submit a copy of the  Project Self-Certification letter and the project review package with all requested information as indicated in the checklist below to complete consultation requirements. 

Non-Federal Applicants must submit a project review package regardless of the determination. 

 

(A) Request a review, if the ESA section 7 determination for any species or critical habitat is "may affect, likely to adversely affect" or the Eagle Act determination is "Eagle Act permit may be required," attach the online Project Review Request Letter   and ensure you provide all requested information as indicated in checklist below. We will respond when we receive a complete project review package. 

(B) Do not request a review, if the ESA section 7 determination for all species and critical habitat is either “no effect” or “may affect, not likely to adversely affect” and the Eagle Act determination is “no Eagle Act permit required,” print the online project and include it in your package. For the certification to be valid, it must be submitted with a project review package to this office. 

Checklist 

Use this list to ensure you have a complete package. Printable Checklist

Steps 1 and 2

Official Species List from  IPaC IPaC
Information for Planning and Consultation (IPaC) is a project planning tool that streamlines the USFWS environmental review process

Learn more about IPaC
 (Must include map showing the action area action area
All areas to be affected directly or indirectly by the federal action and not merely the immediate area involved in the action.

Learn more about action area

Required 

Step 3 NCDENER-Heritage Program database results or correspondence  If applicable 
Step 4 and 5 Habitat Assessments or Species Surveys  If applicable 
Step 6 Bald Eagle Management Guidelines Documentation  Required 
Step 7 NLEB Required 
Step 8 RCW If Action Area is in Sandhills 
Step 9 Species Conclusion Table  Required 
Step 10 Online project review request letter or Online project review certification letter  Required 
  Other documentation to support your conclusions  If applicable 

 

Submit documents electronically to Raleigh@fws.gov 

 

(A) Format and size: We strongly encourage applicants to consolidate documents into a single PDF, smaller than 25MB. If a single email would be larger than 25 MB, please consolidate all items into the least number of documents and e-mails as possible. 

(B) Subject line: Indicate in your email subject title if you are submitting an "online project review request letter" or an "online project review certification letter." Use the same subject line and project reference in all emails related to an individual project. 

(C) Receipt confirmation: All project reviews will receive a return receipt to inform you that your project has been successfully submitted to this office. 

(D) Keep records: Maintain a complete copy of the project review package in your files since it will become an integral part of your official record of compliance. 

(E) Address: Raleigh@fws.gov 

 

If you have questions or comments concerning this process, please contact Leigh Mann at (919) 856-4520 extension 10 or via email at Raleigh@fws.gov