CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) UPDATE
Although most hatchery lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you Recreate Responsibly.

The CDC recommends all individuals wear a mask indoors in public in areas of substantial or high transmission. Recognizing that most of the United States is currently in substantial or high transmission categories and to best protect visitors and our staff, we've implemented a nationwide mask requirement. Masks are now required inside all U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service buildings, regardless of vaccination status or location. All people, regardless of vaccination status, are required to wear a mask on all forms of public transportation and in healthcare settings on DOI lands.

Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick and continue to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and follow CDC guidance on how to protect yourself and others.

About Us

It is the mission of the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office (CRFWCO) to assist in determining the status of imperiled natural stocks, to evaluate management measures for recovery and assist in the recovery of these stocks, and to prevent future listings

What We Do

Our staff collaborates with local, state and Tribal partners to conserve, restore, and improve native fish and aquatic resources throughout Oregon and along the Columbia River and all of its tributaries downstream from McNary Dam to the Pacific Ocean. We study wild and hatchery aquatic organisms and their populations, support habitat restoration, and evaluate restoration projects, fish hatchery practices and human impacts. The results of our studies allow land and natural resource managers to make science informed decisions. 

Our Organization

The CRFWCO provides science-based recommendations for the management of aquatic resources on Federal and Tribal lands in the Pacific Northwest. The programs in our office provide technical assessment, interagency coordination, and representation for technical- and policy-level workgroups, committees, councils, and commissions. Our programs are:

Passage and Habitat Assessment

Natural Population Assessment

Hatchery Assessment

Marking and Tagging

Fisheries Management

GIS and Data

Science Communication and Outreach

The Fish and Aquatic Conservation program leads aquatic conservation efforts for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We are committed to tackling the nation’s highest priority aquatic conservation and recreational challenges to conserve, restore, and enhance fisheries for future generations.

Our Species

Our work focuses on native fish and aquatic species, including those of Tribal importance and species listed under the Endangered Species Act. 

Bull Trout  

Salvelinus confluentus

Pacific Lamprey 

Entosphenus tridentatus

Freshwater Mussels

Western Pearlshell (Margaritifera falcata) Yukon Floater (Anodonta beringiana)   Western Ridged Mussel (Gonidea angulata)

Coastal Cutthroat Trout

Oncorhynchus clarkii

Pacific Salmon (Oncorhynchus sp.)

Chinook (O. tshawytscha) Coho (O. kisutch) Chum (O. keta) Pink (O. gorbuscha) Kokanee (O. nerka)

Steelhead

(Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Aquatic Invasive Species

Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)

 American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus)

Projects and Research

The Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office (CRFWCO) coordinates, facilitates, and implements management actions to conserve and restore fish and aquatic species in the Columbia River Basin and adjacent parts of Oregon, including threatened and endangered resident species, anadromous salmonids, and their associated habitats. Our main conservation and restoration activities include: endangered species review and assessment, fish passage improvement, tagging and marking of anadromous salmonids, Federal hatchery evaluation, harvest management, aquatic invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
monitoring, and various technical assistance programs. We work through collaboration and partnership with other Federal agencies, stakeholder groups, State and Tribal governments, non-governmental organizations, and the public.

Our geographic focus includes the Columbia River and tributaries downstream from McNary Dam to the Pacific Ocean, and the rest of Oregon (except for the Klamath Basin). Providing technical assistance, interagency coordination, and representation on technical and policy level workgroups, committees, councils, and commissions for hydrosystem, hatchery, harvest, and habitat management are the key tasks for the CRFWCO. The CRFWCO work is guided by, and consistent with, the Pacific Region Fisheries Strategic Plan, USFWS National Fisheries Strategic Plan, and Department of Interior Secretarial priorities.

Get Involved

From invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
removal to protecting endangered species, find out what kind of projects and initiatives we're conducting to protect our aquatic resources.

Location and Contact Information