Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area, established in 2012, is located in the transition zone between the Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains.
Trailhead sign that says "Juniper Trail"  at Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge on left.  Trail going off into the distance with a rock on the right.  .
Juniper Trail Opening Celebration!

You are invited to the Juniper Trail Opening Celebration October 14th and 15th!  Come help us celebrate the opening of the trail and National Wildlife Refuge Week! 

Friday, October 14th from 10:00-11:30am there will be a ribbon cutting ceremony and remarks followed by self-guided hikes. 

Saturday, October 15th at 9:00am and 11:00am there will be guided hikes on the trail. 

Visit Us

National wildlife refuges offer us all a chance to unplug from the stresses of daily life and reconnect with our natural surroundings. 

A 2-mile round trip hiking trail (overlooking the Mora River) will be coming soon. Currently, wildlife observation and photography are conducted along the Loma Parda County Road and State Highway 161. Public access is limited to the county road, state highway, and special events on refuge that include organized guided hikes offered throughout the year. Wildlife observation and photography are permitted during organized events. 

Location and Contact Information

      About Us

      Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area, established in 2012, is located in the transition zone between the Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains. The refuge is 4,224 acres and has shortgrass prairie, riparian riparian
      Definition of riparian habitat or riparian areas.

      Learn more about riparian
      wetlands, piñon/juniper, oak, and coniferous forests. Five miles of the Mora River meanders through the refuge. The variety of habitat support a wide range of animal and plant life. Rio Mora National Wildlife Refuge partners with many organizations and facilitates research, outreach, interpretation and environment education. 

      What We Do

      The National Wildlife Refuge System is a series of lands and waters owned and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Wildlife conservation is at the heart of the refuge system. It drives everything we do from the purpose a refuge is established, to the recreational activities offered there, to the resource management tools we use. Selecting the right tools helps us ensure the survival of local plants and animals and helps fulfill the purpose of the refuge.