Trails

Cape Romain's Bulls Island has two designated hiking trails, 16 miles of unpaved service roads, two observation platforms, and a long sandy beach where visitors can experience the sights and sounds of nature. Several benches are located along the trails and roads that traverse salt marsh salt marsh
Salt marshes are found in tidal areas near the coast, where freshwater mixes with saltwater.

Learn more about salt marsh
, forest, and water impoundments.

At the Sewee Visitor and Environmental Education Center, an easy one-mile loop trail takes you past freshwater ponds, over a boardwalk surrounded by bottomland areas of sweet gum, red bay and galberry, and through a mixed hardwood and loblolly and long-leaf pine forest.

You can print out and, or pick up the Bulls Island information/map guide and pick up the Nebo Trail map at the Sewee Center and Refuge Headquarters.

Middens Trail

The Middens Trail is located to the left of Beach Rd, about one-fourth mile from the public boat dock. The trail takes you along salt marsh on your left and maritime forest on your right. You will see freshwater wetlands, home to a variety of species including the American alligator. As you walk through this forested area of palmetto, pine, and myrtle, you will pass by the remains of the Sewee Indian shell middens, the refuse of oyster and clam harvests piled up many hundreds of years ago. Close by is Bulls Bay. At low tide, watch herons and egrets stealthily fish, and listen for the sounds of shrimp popping in shallows and fiddler crabs clicking claws as they scurry to their burrows.
Trail Length (mi)
0.29
Trail Difficulty
Difficulty Meter / introductory
Easy
Estimated Time
20 Minutes
Route Type
Out & back
Suitability
Kid friendly
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Alligator Alley Trail

Trail Length (mi)
1.14
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Big Pond Road Trail

Trail Length (mi)
0.71
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Lighthouse Trail

Trail Length (mi)
0.24
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Summerhouse Trail

Trail Length (mi)
1.13
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Turkey Walk Trail

There are two trailhead locations where you can access the Turkey Walk Trail, which is a designated National Recreation Trail. One is located off of Beach Road, about one-half mile from the beach. The other trailhead is found at the forest edge to the left of the picnic area. The trail meanders along the salt marsh, over the dike that separates Summerhouse ponds and, traverses through the maritime forest of oak, palmetto, holly, pine and other species to Beach Road. You may see resident songbirds, raptors, herons, egrets and shorebirds.  According to the season and habitat, migratory Painted buntings and other songbirds, waterfowl and falcons can be seen. Be sure to look for alligators, white-tailed deer, and black fox squirrels. Benches are placed along the trail to relax, listen and watch for wildlife around you.
Trail Length (mi)
1.37
Trail Difficulty
Difficulty Meter / introductory
Easy
Estimated Time
2 Hours
Route Type
Point to point
Suitability
Kid friendly
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Beach Road Trail

Trail Length (mi)
1.31
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Cross-Dike Trail

Trail Length (mi)
1.05
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Lighthouse Road Trail

Trail Length (mi)
3.32
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Old Fort Trail

Trail Length (mi)
2.77
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Sheephead Ridge Trail

Trail Length (mi)
1.86
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Dave Clough Trail

The David Clough Trail and Viewing Platform overlooks Upper Summerhouse Pond. The trail is located off of the Turkey Walk Trail between Upper and Lower Summerhouse Ponds. Cross the bridge over the pond and take the short walk on the forested peninsula to the platform. The view of open water provides a great place to see ibis, anhingas, great egrets, great blue herons, and other wading birds. American wigeon, scaup and other waterfowl can be seen in the fall and winter months. Look for wood storks roosting in trees along the water’s edge.  
Trail Length (mi)
0.26
Trail Difficulty
Difficulty Meter / introductory
Easy
Estimated Time
45 Minutes
Route Type
Out & back
Suitability
Kid friendly
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