USFWS
Alaska Region
Conserving the Nature of America
Photo of a spoon bill
Spoon bill
 
Our Shared Heritage:  Arctic Breeding Birds in the Yellow Sea
November 19, 2018

“The habitat our Arctic Migratory birds need to survive are being compromised for a variety of reasons.  We have the opportunity now, not years from now to take action together to conserve this important habitat and insure that these birds are able to survive into the future” - Cynthia Jacobson, Chair, CAFF Working Group.

The Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have developed a short film that features the work of the Arctic Migratory Birds Initiative to highlight the plight of Arctic-breeding migratory birds in the East Asian Australasian Flyway, and the international cooperation to reverse declining trends. Video   

 


 
American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month
November 8, 2018

In a state with the largest number of tribes, and a rich and diverse Alaska Native culture, we invite you to join the us in learning from our Alaska Native and American Indian colleagues and neighbors during the National American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month. We are lucky to live and work in a place with beautiful and intact indigenous cultures.  On Veterans Day Thank a Veteran! Alaska Natives and American Indians have served in the U.S. Armed Forces in every major conflict since the Revolutionary War and in greater number per capita than any other ethnic group


Momma bear and cub.  Photo Credit: Lisa Hupp/USFWS
Momma bear and cub
Photo Credit: Lisa Hupp/USFWS
 
Alaska Refuges Showcased on Television
October 30, 2018

Into Alaska, a new series highlighting Kenai and Kodiak National Wildlife Refuges is showing on Animal Planet. The 10-part series takes viewers deep into these spectacular refuges and shows some of the extraordinary challenges Service employees meet while they work to keep these stunning places wild and safe.  Tune in on Mondays at 5 p.m. to Animal Planet for the next episode. 

Protected ocean waters within a fjord, the surface of Three Saints Bay reflects mountains like the surface of a calm lake.  Photo Credit: Robin Corcoran/USFWS
Three Saints Bay
Photo Credit: Robin Corcoran/USFWS
 
Celebrating National Wildlife Refuges
October 17, 2018

National Wildlife Refuge Week, observed the second full week of October each year, celebrates the great network of lands and waters that conserves and protects Americans’ precious wildlife heritage for present and future generations. Here are events and stories from around Alaska's 16 National Wildlife Refuges.

Walrus on ice.  Photo credit: USFWS
Walrus on ice. Photo by USFWS
 
Big Visitors, Big Challenge
September 25, 2018

The elders in Point Lay, a small Inupiaq village in the northwest reaches of Alaska, remember a time when the Arctic sea ice and the animals that depend on it followed reliable patterns. In particular, they tell of a time when only a handful of Pacific walruses visited the shores of the barrier island just beyond their community.

In recent years, what was once true is no longer. Thousands of Pacific walruses now show up, raising concerns and sparking a community-wide effort to help the massive marine mammal survive in a dramatically changing environment. Read more...


Lapland Longspur nest. Lisa Hupp/USFWS
Lapland Longspur nest. Lisa Hupp/USFWS
 
Arctic Refuge Virtual Festival of Birds
September 20, 2018

Every year, thousands of birds fly to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge for the summer to breed, brood, and rest. More than 200 species make this journey. For the first time ever, on September 24-28, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and partners take you deep into the nation’s largest refuge, one of the most important sites for birds anywhere on the planet, for a virtual bird festival to celebrate these intrepid travelers.


Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council with Commissioner Sam Cotten and Regional Director Greg Siekaniec after the ceremony.  Photo by USFWS
Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council with Commissioner Sam Cotten and Regional Director Greg Siekaniec after the ceremony. Photo by USFWS
 
State of Alaska joins Service in Formal Apology for Harmful Impacts of Past Bird Harvest Prohibitions
September 13, 2018

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game formally apologized to Alaska Native peoples Thursday, September 13, 2018. The apology recognizes hardships Alaska Native families experienced from implementation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act in the 1960s and 70s. "This moment ... can bring healing, and healing is what needs to happen for Natives throughout the State," said Gayla Hoseth, AMBCC Native Caucus Co-Chair and Bristol Bay Regional Advisory Committee Representative. Council members honored many Alaska Native leaders who worked to change the Act during the ceremony. The apology was presented to the Alaska Migratory Bird Co-Management Council at their fall meeting by USFWS Regional Director Greg Siekaniec and Alaska Department of Fish and Game Commissioner Sam Cotten. 


Archived Articles

Last updated: November 2018

USFWS Get Connected with Alaska icon Get Connected with Alaska Facebook Social Media Hub Get Connected with Alaska - Images Flickr Get Connected with Alaska Twitter Account Get Connected with Alaska You Tube Account


Read our stories from the field

 

Alaska National Wildlife Refuge maps for your phone or tablet

Download Alaska National Wildlife Refuge
maps for your phone or tablet