Projects and Research

The recovery of listed species and the habitats upon which they depend is the ultimate purpose of the endangered species program and the guiding principle for all of our work. Recovery of imperiled species depends on strong partnerships between Federal, State, and private organizations, and individuals.

Our Projects

  • Aquatic Ecosystems

  • Conservation and Restoration

  • Environmental Contaminants

  • Renewable Energy

 

The ‘Alalā, or Hawaiian Crow, has been extinct in the wild since 2002, preserved only at the Keauhou and Maui Bird Conservation Centers managed by San Diego Zoo Global’s Hawai‘i Endangered Bird Conservation Program. The Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office is working with the State of Hawai‘i Dept. of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife, and San Diego Zoo...

Draft Restoration Plan Addendum and Supplement Environmental Assessment for the May 14, 1996, Chevron Pipeline Oil Spill into Waiau Stream and Pearl Harbor INTRODUCTION:

The Natural Resource Trustees for the Chevron Pipeline Oil Spill of 1996 are proposing to use approximately $850,000 for the construction of an 8.8 acre wetland project to enhance the Pouhala Marsh wildlife sanctuary for...

In January 2020, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published a final rule removing the ‘io (Hawaiian hawk) from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife. The ‘io was listed in 1967. Since then, improved monitoring, partner-led landscape-level conservation efforts and the species’ demonstrated resilience now indicate it no longer meets the definition of threatened or endangered....

The Extinction Crisis

Hawai‘i's endemic forest birds are facing an immediate extinction crisis. Avian malaria, a disease transmitted by invasive mosquitoes, is driving the extinction of Hawai‘i's forest birds and for some species a single bite from an infected mosquito can be deadly. Once, there were more than 50 species of honeycreepers spread throughout the islands; however, today...