Welcome to the Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office! We are part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's ecological services program. Here we work closely with partners to conserve fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats throughout Pacific Islands. The areas we help to protect include the state of Hawaiʻi, the Territory of Guam, the Territory of American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and the islands and waters located within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Rose Atoll Marine National Monument, and the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument. Our office also coordinates with partners on conservation projects in many insulars areas across the Pacific including the Republic of Palau, Federated States of Micronesia, and Republic of Marshall Islands.
CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) NOTICE

CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19) NOTICE

Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you recreate responsibly.

  • Check alerts and local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information. Operations vary based on local public health conditions.
  • Consistent with CDC recommendations, all visitors (age 2 and older), who are fully vaccinated are required to wear a mask inside of federal buildings in areas of substantial or high community transmission.. All visitors who are not fully vaccinated must continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces.
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick and continue to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and follow CDC guidance on how to protect yourself and others.

About Us

 

The Pacific Islands Fish and Wildlife Office holds locations in Honolulu and Hagatna, Guam, as well as staff stationed on Kauai, the island of Hawaii, and Saipan in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Our goals include preventing species from going extinct, conserving the habitats those species rely on, and managing the threats to both species and habitats for future generations.

What We Do

The mission of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife is working with others, to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Our Organization

The recovery of listed species and the habitats upon which they depend is the ultimate purpose of the endangered species program and the guiding principle for all of our work. Recovery of imperiled species depends on strong partnerships between Federal, State, and private organizations, and individuals. Some of our programs include: 

  • Fisheries Partnerships Program

  • Candidate Conservation Program

  • Coastal Program

  • Partners for Fish and Wildlife

Projects and Research

 

From invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
removal to protecting endangered species, find out what kind of projects and initiatives we're conducting throughout the Pacific Islands.

 

Our Library

Here you will find library collections containing a variety of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service publications, reports, fact sheets, media and documents along with other reference material.

A Hawaiian petrel flies above the ocean
Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Kauaʻi Island Utility Cooperative Habitat Conservation Plan

Agency Docket No. FWS-R1-ES-2022-0068

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement to...

Get Involved

The conservation and protection of wildlife depends on all of us. Volunteers help us succeed in reclaiming plants, wildlife, and their habitats that are threatened by climate change climate change
Climate change includes both global warming driven by human-induced emissions of greenhouse gases and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns. Though there have been previous periods of climatic change, since the mid-20th century humans have had an unprecedented impact on Earth's climate system and caused change on a global scale.

Learn more about climate change
, development, and invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
. Learn how you can help by visiting www.volunteer.gov.

Location and Contact Information