Projects and Research

A Refuge biologist installs a mechanism to prevent beavers from flooding a road.

Wildlife conservation is at the heart of the National Wildlife Refuge System. It drives everything on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands and waters managed within the Refuge System, from the purposes for which a national wildlife refuge national wildlife refuge
A national wildlife refuge is typically a contiguous area of land and water managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  for the conservation and, where appropriate, restoration of fish, wildlife and plant resources and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.

Learn more about national wildlife refuge
is established to the recreational activities offered to the resource management tools used. Using conservation best practices, the Refuge System manages Service lands and waters to help ensure the survival of native wildlife species.

Current and recent projects include:

  • Monitoring and researching the population and distribution of the Jackson Elk Herd
  • Monitoring for wildlife diseases in ungulates
  • Weed mapping
  • Trumpeter swan nesting season observations
  • Curlew observations 
CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD) SURVEILLANCE AND TESTING 

On December 16, 2020, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s Wildlife Health Laboratory confirmed that an elk in Grand Teton National Park tested positive for CWD. In response, the National Elk Refuge is increasing surveillance during all field operations to watch for animals displaying symptoms of CWD; euthanizing and...

Since 2005, the National Elk Refuge and Wyoming Game & Fish Department have been monitoring elk distribution through the use of tracking collars.

Elk location data collected from the collars help wildlife managers map elk movement and habitat use, design hunting seasons to meet objectives, monitor the effects of wolves on elk density, and evaluate the effects of elk density...