Working around Eagles

Bald eagles or golden eagles, or both species, may be living or migrating in the vicinity of work activities and projects. We provide guidance and recommendations for working around eagles and considering the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act.

Bald Eagle Management Guidelines

National bald eagle management guidelines

These guidelines were developed by the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service to advise landowners, land managers and others who share public and private lands with bald eagles about when and under what circumstances the protective provisions of the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act may apply to their...

Golden Eagle Disturbance

Golden eagles may be sensitive to the presence and activities of humans and potentially easily disturbed.  The Service has drafted a synthesis of scientific information on human disturbance of golden eagles.

Considering disturbance to golden eagles

Regional Guidelines

bald eagle adult and juveniles in tree
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has recommended buffers for creating no-disturbance zones around bald and golden eagle nests in California and Nevada.
Bald Eagle Monitoring Guidelines-Southeastern US

This step-by-step guidance will help you determine if your new or intermittent activity near an eagle nest, including alternate nests, is likely to take or disturb bald eagles (a potential violation of the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act) and measures that you can adopt to avoid that...

Eagles and Home Construction in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho

If you're constructing homes in Washington, Oregon, or Idaho, you can answer a few questions about your project or activity and eagles in the vicinity to self-determine whether or not you should apply for an eagle take permit, or whether you need further technical assistance from the Service.

Pacific Region Decision Tree

Eagle Nest Protections

Along with protecting eagles, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act also protects eagle nests. Eagle nests are protected at all times, not just when the nests are in use by eagles. This means eagle nests can never be removed or destroyed, no matter what time of year it is, without a permit.

More information on eagle nest removal permits:

An adult bald perches on the edge of a large nest, watching over it's nestling

A Federal eagle nest take permit authorizes the take of eagle nests in limited circumstances. Permits are available to individuals, agencies, businesses, and other organizations. This permit does not authorize possession of any eagle, eagle parts, or eagle nests.

This permit may be...

Eagle Nest Survey Guidance

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced new guidance regarding eagle nest survey areas. The updated recommendation is to conduct field surveys for eagle nests only within 2 miles around the project footprint. This guidance supersedes the recommendations in the Service's 2013 Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance.

Updated Eagle Nest Survey Protocol

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issues protocols for data collection of eagles nests for eagle incidental take permitting. 

Memo Regarding Eagle Nest Survey Guidance

The purpose of this memorandum is to provide a technical update to eagle nest survey protocols for eagle incidental permitting.

Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance

The Service developed Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance in 2013, which provides specific in-depth guidance for conserving bald and golden eagles in the course of siting, construction and operation of wind energy facilities

Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance

This guidance provides specific in-depth guidance for conserving bald and golden eagles in the course of siting, construction and operation of wind energy facilities.

Do I Need an Eagle Take Permit?

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service may issue permits for the take, possession, or transportation of bald and golden eagles, as well as their parts, nests, and eggs.

More about Eagle Permits

Found a Dead Eagle or Eagle Feathers?

For most people, the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act prohibits possession of dead eagles and eagle parts, which includes eagle feathers.  If you find a dead eagle please answer the following questions before touching or moving the eagle:

  • Do you have reason to suspect the eagle’s death was intentionally caused by a human?
  • Do you believe the eagle was electrocuted?
  • Do you believe the eagle was shot or poisoned?
  • Does it appear that feathers or any body parts have been intentionally removed from the eagle?

If the answer to any of the above questions is “yes”, immediately call the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Law Enforcement office at: (1-844-397-8477).

If the answer to all of the above questions is “no”, dead eagles and all eagle parts, including feathers, must be transferred to the National Eagle Repository unless otherwise authorized by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The National Eagle Repository provides Guidelines for Shipping Eagles to the Repository.

Even if you only find eagle feathers, these feathers can't be kept, but must be transferred to the National Eagle Repository unless otherwise authorized by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

If you found a dead eagle in the Puget Sound area, you are authorized to temporarily collect the eagle remains and transport them within 24 hours to the nearest drop-off center. Please review the list below and call the nearest drop-off center to arrange transfer of the remains.

List of Eagle Remains Drop-off Locations around Puget Sound
Puget Sound NorthPuget Sound EastPuget Sound WestPuget Sound South
USFWS - Blaine Wildlife Inspectors 
9925 Pacific Hwy
Blaine, WA 98188
(360) 332-5388
USFWS Law Enforcement 
14852 NE 95th St
Redmond, WA 98052
(425) 883-8122
Washington Maritime National Wildlife Refuge Complex 
715 Holgerson Rd
Sequim, WA 98382
(360) 457-8451 
Billy Frank Jr. Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge 
100 Brown Farm Rd NE
Olympia, WA 98516
(360) 753-9467
Wolf Hollow Wildlife Rehab Center 
284 Boyce Road
Friday Harbor, WA 98250 
(360) 378-5000
USFWS - SeaTac Wildlife Inspectors 
17930 International Blvd
Seattle, WA 98188
(206) 241-0191
Quilcene National Fish Hatchery 
281 Fish Hatchery Rd
Quilcene, WA 98376
(360) 765-3334
USFWS – Washington Fish and Wildlife Office 
510 Desmond Dr. SE, Suite 102
Lacey, WA 98503
(360) 753-9440
Featherhaven 
46119 284th Ave SE
Enumclaw, WA 98022
(253) 350-5792
West Sound Wildlife Shelter 
7501 NE Dolphin Dr 
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110 
(206) 855-9057
Wildlife Services, Washington 
720 O’Leary Street NW Olympia, WA 98502
(360) 753-9884
Toll-free: 1-866-4USDAWS
NOTE: More drop off locations are available around Puget Sound. Call number above to see if there is one closer to you than the Olympia office