Most recent Connecticut River Basin Fishway Passage Counts

Fishways have opened up hundreds of miles of river to migratory fish in the Connecticut River watershed! We know this because we count the number of fish passing through these structures. Knowing how many fish and what species use these fishways helps us make decisions on how to best restore our migratory fishes.

The Leesville Dam on the Salmon River in Connecticut is monitored only for Atlantic salmon. The Salmon River joins the Connecticut River 18 miles upstream of the Long Island Sound.

The Rainbow Dam in Connecticut is the first dam on the Farmington River, and is located 8 miles upstream of where the Farmington River joins the Connecticut River. The Farmington River joins the Connecticut River about 57 miles upstream of Long Island Sound.

The West Springfield dam (formerly called the DSI Dam) in Massachusetts is the first dam on the Westfield River, and is located 4 miles upstream of where the river joins the Connecticut River. Westfield River joins the Connecticut River 75 miles upstream of the Long Island Sound.

The Holyoke Dam in Massachusetts is the first dam on the mainstem of the Connecticut River, and is 87 miles upstream of the Long Island Sound.

The Turners Falls Dam fish ladder in Massachusetts is 122 miles upstream of the Long Island Sound; The Vernon Dam fish ladder is located in Vermont, 142 miles upstream of the Long Island Sound.

The Bellows Falls Dam fish ladder is located in Vermont, 174 miles upstream of the Long Island Sound.

2021 Fishway Count Report

This report is compiled by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, CT River Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office using fishway count data provided by several agencies as well as power companies and is dependent in most cases on the review of video counts, that have an associated time lag for...

2020 Summary Counts Report 2020

This report is compiled by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, CT River Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office using fishway count data provided by several agencies as well as power companies and is dependent in most cases on the review of video counts, that have an associated time lag for...

Historic Fish Counts

Historic migratory fish counts from 1967 to 2020 in the Connecticut River.

The Fish and Aquatic Conservation program leads aquatic conservation efforts for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We are committed to tackling the nation’s highest priority aquatic conservation and recreational challenges to conserve, restore, and enhance fisheries for future generations.
The Fish Passage Program works with local communities on a voluntary basis to restore rivers and conserve our nation’s aquatic resources by removing or bypassing barriers. Our projects benefit both fish and people.
The National Fish Habitat Partnership is a comprehensive effort to treat the causes of fish habitat decline, not just the symptoms. The Partnership is a national investment strategy to maximize the impact of conservation dollars on the ground. Funds are leveraged through regional partnerships to...