Facility Activities

Visitor activities at the Refuge

  •  HIKE the the Alder Island Nature Trail
     
  •  PHOTOGRAPH Great Blue Herons and other birds
     
  •  PADDLE in the bay and tidal sloughs
     
  •  FISH along the banks for salmon
     
  •  HUNT waterfowl seasonally in designated areas

The fastest growing activity on national wildlife refuges in the past ten years has been wildlife photography. That’s not surprising—the digital camera population explosion and cell phones with ever-improving picture-taking abilities are increasing the number of nature photographers at a rapid...

The Alder Island Nature Trail is a short (1/2 mile), easy walking trail that winds along the Siletz River and Millport Slough.  It's open from sunrise to sunset and is a wonderful place to look for songbirds and waterfowl using refuge lands. Access the trailhead...

Birding at Siletz Bay NWR is rewarding year round. SPRING Flocks of migrating birds and waterfowl swell the ranks of resident and overwintering populations. Some stop only briefly on the estuary to feed and rest, soon resuming their migration north to Arctic breeding...

Visitors can explore the Refuge with kayaks, canoes, paddleboards and other non-motorized boats by using the boat launch adjacent to the small parking area at Alder island. This car-top boat launch is for the launch of non-motorized boats only: it is not a trailer-accessible ramp. It...

The lower Siletz River is popular for anyone wanting to fish for salmon. The Siletz River, which runs alongside the refuge, has both a spring and fall run of Chinook salmon along with coho, steelhead and cutthroat trout. The refuge offers bank fishing from the Alder Island Nature Trail....

Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge on Oregon’s central coast includes tidal salt marsh, diked former tidal marsh and smaller forested areas. Large numbers of migratory birds use the marshes and tidal slough areas. Hunters can expect to find mallard, American wigeon, green-winged teal and...

Tips to make watching wildlife enjoyable and rewarding: 

•Keep voices down while approaching a viewing area to avoid scaring wildlife away before you get there. Although animals may disappear when you arrive, they often return shortly if you are quiet and still.

•Use...

Painting and sketching in nature is possible at nearly all sites open to the public. Sometimes, sites host public displays of artworks created on the refuge.
Some refuges allow people to forage in designated areas for seasonal nuts, berries and mushrooms.