Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we encourage you to:

  • Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information
  • Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick


Features

  • Northern pintail winter at Willapa NWR

    Homeward Bound

    Willapa is for the birds! Check the skies and shorelines for migrating birds - including shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors and songbirds.

    Uncover refuge wildlife watching hotspots

  • Get up close and personal with a rough-skinned newt this spring at the refuge/Photo Courtesy of Dr. Madeline Kalbach

    Amphibians Abound

    Numerous amphibians make their home in the refuge and it is a great time to view them. Look for newts and frogs on damp days.

    Learn more about Refuge amphibians...

  • Herons in gather to eat the bounty of Willapa Bay/Photo Courtesy of Curt Stephens

    In the Mix

    Ocean tides combine life-giving nourishment with nutrient-laden fresh waters, creating one of the most productive environments on earth.

    Learn more about the estuary

What's Happening at the Refuge

The Art of Discovery

Art trail promo 60x60

Explore the story of a Refuge stream, told through structures and sculptures rather than words. Can't make it to the refuge - take a virtual tour!

Take the virtual tour

Spring's Here!

Willow/Photo Courtesy of Dr. Madeline Kalbach

The blooming willows are a sure sign spring is here. Did you know Washington has 32 native species of willows and 4 introduced species? That's not counting ornamental species planted by homeowners and gardeners. By the way, the iconic weeping willow is not native to the state—and there are dozens of types of weeping willows (but Washington has only one).

Search for spring arrivals...

Proposed Hunting Expansion

April 30, 2020 Elk Promo

The comment period for the Willapa National Wildlife Refuge draft hunting compatibility determination closed on April 30, 2020. The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service would like to thank everyone who provided comments. We are currently in the process of reviewing comments. While we are no longer accepting comments, the draft is still available to provide everyone a chance to familiarize themselves with the proposed actions. Please continue to check this site for additional information and decisions on the proposed action. Comments on proposed changes to sport hunting and fishing regulations for the 2020-21 season (www.regulations.gov/docket?D=FWS-HQ-NWRS-2020-0013), covering all National Wildlife Refuge and Fish Hatcheries nationwide, are being accepted through June 8, 2020.

Expanded Hunting Opportunities Proposed
Connect to Nature

Natural Resource Center

NRC Rendering

Phase 1 of the Natural Resource Center has begun! We are replacing the existing refuge headquarters, which is structurally failing and lacks reliable utilities, with a new multipurpose building located at the east end of 67th Place on the Riekkola Unit. The new building will be more efficient as well as more accessible to our community and visitors to the Long Beach Peninsula serving as a focal point for recreation activities including hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, photography, hiking, kayaking and more. Construction began in June 2019 and is anticipated to be completed by summer of 2020. Phase 2 of the project, the visitor center including with environmental education/event room, exhibits, nature store, and parking area, has not been funded.

Click here for more design views

About the Complex

Willapa Complex

Willapa National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Willapa Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS