The Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge was established in 1997 to conserve, protect and enhance the abundance and diversity of native plant, fish and wildlife species and the ecosystems on which they depend throughout the 7.2 million acre Connecticut River watershed. Currently, the refuge is comprised of nearly 40,000 acres within parts of the four watershed states of New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, and Connecticut.

The refuge includes ten divisions and twelve units that represent a wide variety of unique habitats such as: northern forest valuable as nesting habitat for migrant thrushes, warblers and other birds; rivers and streams used by shad, salmon, herring and other migratory fishes; and an internationally significant complex of high-quality tidal fresh, brackish and salt marshes. Many opportunities exist for visitors to explore the diverse landscapes of the Connecticut River watershed.

Visit Us

Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge offers a wide variety of options for visitors throughout its twenty-two locations in four New England States. From hiking and kayaking to bird watching, fishing and hunting, the refuge lends itself to anyone interested in spending time outdoors. Of particular note is the opportunity for people of all abilities to have access to refuge land. We manage several universally accessible trails at our Fort River Division, Pondicherry Division and Nulhegan Basin Division.

All Refuge Divisions and Units are open year round from one half hour before sunrise to one half hour after sun set.

 

 

Location and Contact Information

      Our Species

      Our Library

      Get Involved

      Friends Groups, internships and volunteering are just few ways to get involved with the Conte Refuge. 

      Projects and Research

      The Silvio O. Conte National Fish and Wildlife Refuge works in partnership with a wide variety of individuals and organizations to provide environmental education, to encourage and support appropriate habitat conservation and management on public and private lands, and to protect habitat. Land acquisition activities have resulted in the protection of key habitats for neotropical migratory birds, waterfowl, and threatened and endangered species. Through partnerships, the Service has reached across the watershed to support and encourage conservation and environmental education efforts by others. Additionally, the refuge has conducted conservation, education, and interpretation activities since the refuge was established, including the establishment of an Urban Wildlife Conservation Partnership, a visitor contact station, and a variety of visitor contact points.