Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge was authorized in 1992 and established in 1997 to restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat in and along the Missouri River. At Boyer Chute, the namesake side channel was restored after being blocked in 1937 to aid riverboat navigation. Following restoration, many of the wildlife species that historically utilized the land began to return and flourish in the area. On Boyer Chute visitors enjoy hiking and birding along the nearly 8 miles of hiking trails, hunting of white-tailed deer and turkey in the bottomland forests, and fishing along the restored chute.
Detour to Boyer Chute due to Road Closure

Due to continuing road work on County Rd 34, there is a detour to access the main unit of Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge. To get to the main unit please follow this detour: 

From Highway 75 turn onto County Rd P38, then left onto County Rd P49, left onto County Rd 51, and then right onto County Rd 34. 

Visit Us

Canada geese in a wetland.

National wildlife refuges offer us all a chance to unplug from the stresses of daily life and reconnect with our natural surroundings. Located right along the Missouri River, Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge provides a number of great opportunities to explore, discover and learn about the plants, wildlife and habitat of the Missouri River floodplain. No matter the season, there is always something visitors can enjoy at Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge! 

Location and Contact Information

      About Us

      A refuge wetland.

      Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge was authorized in 1992 and established in 1997 to restore and protect fish and wildlife habitat in and along the Missouri River. At Boyer Chute, the namesake side channel was restored after being blocked in 1937 to aid riverboat navigation. Following restoration, many of the wildlife species that historically utilized the land began to return and flourish in the area. On Boyer Chute visitors enjoy hiking and birding along the nearly 8 miles of hiking trails, hunting of white-tailed deer and turkey in the bottomland forests, and fishing along the restored chute. 

      Tours

      Start your visit at Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge with a drive on the auto tour route. This short drive takes you along the edge of the restored chute. Along the route are a number of parking lots providing access points to stop and bank fish along the Missouri River side channel or just to explore. At Sauger Parking Lot is an observation platform that extends out over the chute and provides for a good scenic view of this restored waterway. From the Main Parking Lot originates most of the trail system. A bridge from the Main Parking Lot will take visitors over the chute and onto Boyer Island. The island has an extensive network of trails along with a picnic shelter for visitors to enjoy. Boyer Chute does not have an office of visitor contact station. If you have questions regarding your visit, please contact the staff by calling the main number for DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge at 712-388-4800. 

      What We Do

      A refuge biologist releasing a banded mallard.

      The National Wildlife Refuge System is a series of lands and waters owned and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Wildlife conservation is at the heart of the refuge system. It drives everything we do from the purpose a refuge is established, to the recreational activities offered there, to the resource management tools we use. Selecting the right tools helps us ensure the survival of local plants and animals and helps fulfill the purpose of the refuge.

      Our Species

      American coots in a wetland covered in snow.

      Thousands of acres of floodplain forest, tallgrass prairie, and wetlands are currently being restored and protected within the refuge boundary. These habitats benefit a wide variety of wildlife including some 240 species of birds, 80 species of fish, and 70 species of mammals, reptiles and amphibians.

      A large raptor, the bald eagle has a wingspread of about seven feet. Adults have a dark brown body and wings, white head and tail, and a yellow beak. Juveniles are mostly brown with white mottling on the body, tail, and undersides of wings. Adult plumage usually is obtained by the sixth year. In...

      FWS Focus