Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is one of the largest urban wildlife refuges in the nation with more than 145,000 acres of land where visitors can reconnect with nature.
Prescribed Fire and Temporary Closures May 18-19, 2022

Fire management officials at the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) are planning to conduct a prescribed burn prescribed burn
A prescribed burn is the controlled use of fire to restore wildlife habitat, reduce wildfire risk, or achieve other habitat management goals. We have been using prescribed burn techniques to improve species habitat since the 1930s.

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for hazardous fuel reduction. Current weather conditions look favorable to complete the burn during May 18-19, 2022. The Refuge Interior, including the 5.5-mile Canoe Trail, will be temporarily closed to public access during the prescribed fire and will reopen on Friday, May 20, 2022. The perimeter canal will remain open. These dates may be adjusted as weather conditions dictate. The fire will be ignited primarily from a helicopter with assistance from ground crews. Smoke will be readily visible from areas in western Palm Beach County and northern Broward County. Wind direction is predicted to be from the east/southeast and will carry smoke away from populated areas.

Learn more about prescribed fire on our What We Do page.

Visit Us

Visitors to Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge can experience the Florida Everglades just miles from the busy noise and traffic of city life. National wildlife refuges offer us all a chance to unplug from the stresses of daily life and reconnect with our natural surroundings.

A visit to a  national wildlife refuge national wildlife refuge
A national wildlife refuge is typically a contiguous area of land and water managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  for the conservation and, where appropriate, restoration of fish, wildlife and plant resources and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.

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 is a great way to enjoy the great outdoors and discover a new place. Whether you enjoy hiking, biking, boatingcanoeing, hunting, fishing, wildlife photography, birding, or watching wildlife, a visit to Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is a great way to explore nature.

Fees: $10/daily, $25/annually.

Location and Contact Information

      About Us

      Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1951 and is located in Palm Beach County, Florida.

      The refuge protects 145,188 acres, or 226 square miles, of Everglades ecosystems including a mosaic of wet prairies, sawgrass ridges, sloughs, tree islands, cattail communities, and a 400-acre cypress swamp. These lands and waters provide habitat for more than 250 species of birds, 60 species of reptiles and amphibians, 40 species of butterflies, and 20 types of mammals.

      Tours

      Guided walks and interpretive tours are offered throughout the year by staff and volunteer naturalists. Check out our Events page for a current schedule. 

      Canoe and kayak rentals are available at Loxahatchee Adventures.

      What We Do

      Wildlife conservation is at the heart of the National Wildlife Refuge System. It drives everything on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands and waters managed within the Refuge System, from the purposes for which a  national wildlife refuge national wildlife refuge
      A national wildlife refuge is typically a contiguous area of land and water managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  for the conservation and, where appropriate, restoration of fish, wildlife and plant resources and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.

      Learn more about national wildlife refuge
       is established to the recreational activities offered to the resource management tools used. Using conservation best practices, the Refuge System manages Service lands and waters to help ensure the survival of native wildlife species.

      Our Organization

      The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages an unparalleled network of public lands and waters called the National Wildlife Refuge System. With more than 560 refuges spanning the country, this system protects iconic species and provides some of the best wildlife viewing opportunities on Earth.
      The Urban Wildlife Conservation Program improves lives by expanding access to green space, education and outdoor recreation for Americans living in and around cities. Program members work to clear social and historical barriers and foster new connections that advance conservation and strengthen...

      Our Species

      More than 250 species of birds, 60 species of reptiles and amphibians, 40 species of butterflies, and 20 types of mammals are found on the refuge. Visitors frequently see alligators, bobcats, white-tailed deer, and a variety of bird-life including sandhill cranes, pileated woodpeckers, herons, egrets, wood storks and the federally endangered snail kite.

      Check out recent birds sightings on eBird and wildlife sightings on iNaturalist.

      American Alligator
      alligator
      gator
      Florida alligator
      Mississippi alligator
      Louisiana alligator
      The American alligator is a large, semi-aquatic, armored reptile that is related to crocodiles. Their body alone ranges from 6 - 14 feet long. Almost black in color, the it has prominent eyes and nostrils with coarse scales over the entire body. It has a large, long head with visible upper teeth...
      FWS Focus
      Everglade Snail Kite
      The Everglade snail kite is a medium-sized hawk with a wingspan of about 45 inches, very similar to the marsh hawk but without wavering, tilting flight. The beak is slender and very hooked. The adult males are slate gray with black head and wing tips, a white patch at the base of a square tail, and...
      FWS Focus

      Our Library

      Welcome to our digital library of refuge documents. 

      Get Involved

      Discover for yourself what tens of thousands of volunteers across the U.S. have learned: Volunteering at a national wildlife refuge national wildlife refuge
      A national wildlife refuge is typically a contiguous area of land and water managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  for the conservation and, where appropriate, restoration of fish, wildlife and plant resources and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.

      Learn more about national wildlife refuge
      is fun and rewarding in many ways. Master new skills. Meet new friends. Enjoy a sense of accomplishment from doing your part to further wildlife conservation for the pleasure of generations to follow.