Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge is one of the largest urban wildlife refuges in the nation with more than 145,000 acres of land where visitors can unplug from the stresses of daily life and reconnect with our natural surroundings.
Refuge News and Information

Navigating to the Refuge

To avoid delays in getting to the Headquarters Area and visitor center on Lee Road, please type in the full address (10216 Lee Road, Boynton Beach, FL, 33473) into your mapping app that you use for navigating to the refuge.

Pet Walking 

We allow pet walking only on the Perimeter Levee Trail. Pet walking is not permitted at the visitor center, Cypress Swamp Boardwalk, along Lee Road, or at the A, B, and C impoundments. More information on our pet walking page.

Temporary Closures

  • Pond Lily (C6) Pavilion is closed until further notice.
  • Oct 2023 to Fall 2024: Hillsboro Area Detour. Approximately 6.2 miles of Loxahatchee Road is undergoing construction from Oct 2023 to the fall 2024. To reach the boat ramps, follow the detour signs. From US-441 turn west onto Holmberg Road, then north (right) onto University Drive, then turn left onto State Hwy 827/Loxahatchee Road. Visit the Florida Department of Transportation website to view more information about the project.  

Pay your entrance fee on Recreation.gov

Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge makes it easy for you to pay your entrance fee (or buy an annual pass) before you visit, using recreation.gov. Learn more about fees at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge.

Volunteers Needed

We need maintenance volunteers to help with weekly trash pick-ups at our Hillsboro Entrance parking lot at the end of Loxahatchee Road. If you are interested please reach out to Maria_Quitugua@fws.gov. Learn more on our Get Involved page.

A man walking a dog on a levee with blue skies, white puffy clouds, and a rainbow.
We allow pet walking only on the Perimeter Levee Trail. All pets must be either confined or on a leash no longer than six feet.
A volunteer stands alongside the project leader on a wooden pavilion.
Our refuge volunteers lead tours, assist with special events, help restore habitat, remove invasives, and more!

Visit Us

Welcome! Visitors to Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge can experience the Florida Everglades just miles from the busy noise and traffic of city life.

Our visitor center is open daily from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. Stop by the front desk to learn about recent wildlife sightings, view our calendar of events, and learn about opportunities for hiking, biking, boatingcanoeing, hunting, fishing, wildlife photography, birdingwatching wildlife, and more. A visit to the refuge is a fantastic way to explore the great outdoors and reconnect with nature!

Entrance Fee: $10/daily or $25/annually per vehicle. A variety of passes can be purchased in-person at the visitor center, seasonally at fee booths, or you can buy your pass online through Recreation.gov. Learn more about entrance fees and passes on the Visit Us page. 

Check out our Learning at Lox videos on YouTube!

USFWS

Location and Contact Information

      About Us

      Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1951 and is located in Palm Beach County, Florida.

      The refuge protects 145,188 acres, or 226 square miles, of Everglades ecosystems including a mosaic of wet prairies, sawgrass ridges, sloughs, tree islands, cattail communities, and a 400-acre cypress swamp. These lands and waters provide habitat for more than 250 species of birds, 60 species of reptiles and amphibians, 40 species of butterflies, and 20 types of mammals.

      Tours

      Guided walks and interpretive tours are offered throughout the year by staff and volunteer naturalists.

      Events

      What We Do

      Wildlife conservation is at the heart of the National Wildlife Refuge System. It drives everything on U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service lands and waters managed within the Refuge System, from the purposes for which a  national wildlife refuge national wildlife refuge
      A national wildlife refuge is typically a contiguous area of land and water managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  for the conservation and, where appropriate, restoration of fish, wildlife and plant resources and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.

      Learn more about national wildlife refuge
       is established to the recreational activities offered to the resource management tools used. Using conservation best practices, the Refuge System manages Service lands and waters to help ensure the survival of native wildlife species.

      Services
      Silhouette of a person walking with a shotgun on the tundra

      Some commercial, recreational and research activities are allowed on national wildlife refuges only with a special use permit issued by the local office, and are subject to specific conditions and fees. This permit requirement is meant to ensure that all activities at the federal site are...

      Children in yellow shirts run down a path or trail at Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge

      The Every Kid Outdoors program allows 4th-graders to see America’s natural wonders and historic sites for free.

      Annual 4th Grade Pass

      Cost: Free, non-transferable, valid for the duration of the 4th-grade schoolyear though the following summer (September-August).

      ...
      2023-2024 Federal Duck Stamp featuring three tundra swans painted by Joseph Hautman from Minnesota. (c) USFWS
      5/16/2024 Statement on Duck Stamp Modernization Act  

      On December 19, 2023, President Biden signed into law the Duck Stamp Modernization Act of 2023. This Act modifies provisions regarding the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, commonly referred to as the...

      Our Organization

      A bright blue sky obstructed by fluffy white clouds reflected off of a stream shot from inside a kayak
      The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages an unparalleled network of public lands and waters called the National Wildlife Refuge System. With more than 570 refuges spanning the country, this system protects iconic species and provides some of the best wildlife viewing opportunities on Earth.
      A bison grazing in the foreground with mountains and a city and electrical infrastructure in the background
      The Urban Wildlife Conservation Program improves lives by expanding access to green space, education and outdoor recreation for Americans living in and around cities. Program members work to clear social and historical barriers and foster new connections that advance conservation and strengthen...

      Our Species

      More than 250 species of birds, 60 species of reptiles and amphibians, 40 species of butterflies, and 20 types of mammals are found on the refuge. Visitors frequently see alligators, bobcats, white-tailed deer, and a variety of bird-life including sandhill cranes, pileated woodpeckers, herons, egrets, wood storks and the federally endangered snail kite.

      Check out recent birds sightings on eBird and wildlife sightings on iNaturalist.

      Our Library

      Welcome to our digital library of refuge documents. 

      Get Involved

      Volunteer Opportunities

      Discover for yourself what tens of thousands of volunteers across the U.S. have learned: Volunteering at a national wildlife refuge national wildlife refuge
      A national wildlife refuge is typically a contiguous area of land and water managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  for the conservation and, where appropriate, restoration of fish, wildlife and plant resources and their habitats for the benefit of present and future generations of Americans.

      Learn more about national wildlife refuge
      is fun and rewarding in many ways. Master new skills. Meet new friends. Enjoy a sense of accomplishment from doing your part to further wildlife conservation for the pleasure of generations to follow.

      Projects and Research

      Learn about our projects and research, including Burmese python management in South Florida.