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Features

  • Lighthouse Trail

    TRAIL CLOSURES

    Lighthouse Trail & parking lot, as well as the parking lot for Woodland Trail are closed until further notice.

  • Promo - OSV Zone

    South OSV Zone - COMPLETE CLOSURE

    Due to overwash, the North & South Oversand Vehicle Zones are completely closed until it is safe for driving.

    OSV permit information (NPS website)

  • Event - Junior Duck Stamp

    Winners Announced!

    Virginia's Best of Show won the National Junior Duck Stamp Contest! Congratulations to the winning artist Isaac Schreiber.

    Click here for the Virginia State Results (pdf 680KB)

  • Hours

    Refuge Hours

    The refuge is open from 6am to 8pm, 7 days a week. Visitor Center hours are 9am to 4pm, 7 days a week.

    Contact Info, Hours & Directions

  • Wildlife Viewing

    Recent Bird Sightings

    This list shows data from eBird Trail Tracker. Since many refuge locations are included, one species may be listed multiple times.

    Recent Bird Sightings

REFUGE NEWSLETTER

Refuge Newsletter

Monarch with Boy

Read the latest updates from around the refuge!

January 2017 Newsletter (pdf 333KB)

CCP UPDATE

Final CCP Released

We are pleased to announce the release of the final comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for Chincoteague and Wallops Island National Wildlife Refuges (NWR). The 15-year management plan will guide refuge practices to achieve our wildlife conservation mission and to support public use on the refuge.

Chincoteague and Wallops Island NWRs Final CCP

CCP FACT SHEET

Summary Document Available

2016 Photo Contest Winner

You can now download a quick synopsis of the final comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for Chincoteague and Wallops Island National Wildlife Refuges (NWR). This 15-year management plan will guide refuge practices to achieve our wildlife conservation mission and to support public use on the refuge.

Comprehensive Conservation Plan Fact Sheet (pdf - 550KB)

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS  

Follow NWRS Online

 

Around the Refuge

  • Beach Road Paving Updates

    Paving promo 150x118

    Starting April 26th, the Lighthouse Trail and associated parking lot will be closed. The Woodland Trail parking lot is also closed until further notice. Over the next few months, visitors should expect intermittent one-lane closures along Beach Road and a temporary closure of the Woodland Trail. Please reduce your speed and obey temporary traffic signals. Biking to the beach? Please use Swan Cove Trail to access the beach safely. Updates will be posted on our website throughout the project.

    Click to enlarge Paving Map & More info (pdf 1MB)
  • Refuge Transfers $1.5 million to the Town of Chincoteague

    Transportation Partnership PROMO 150x118

    Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge recently transferred $1.5 million to the Town of Chincoteague. The purpose of this grant is to enhance tourism by promoting visitor safety of bicyclists and pedestrians accessing the Refuge through the main thoroughfares of Town.

    Read More (pdf 17.8KB)
  • 2017 Youth Art Contest for IMBC

    IMBC Youth Art Contest (promo 150x118)

    Are you a young, aspiring wildlife artist? Perhaps you know one. We are pleased to invite youth artists (K-12) to submit entries in a children’s art contest that will be held as part of our International Migratory Bird Day Celebration. This freestyle art contest, sponsored by the Historic Main Street Merchants Association, must be an original drawing of a migratory bird that can be seen at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge.

    Contest Details
  • What Happened to the Forest?

    Thinning at Bivalve trail promo 150x118

    You may have noticed some dramatic changes to our forest, particularly along Bivalve Trail. In the fall of 2016, the refuge contracted a forester to cut down southern pine beetle infested trees in this and two other areas. Although environmental and climatic factors that contribute to beetle infestations are difficult to identify, thinning these stands of loblolly pine trees may help us suppress the spread of the beetle and could protect the remaining parts of our forests from the outbreak.

    Read more & learn about the southern pine beetle (pdf 1.3MB)
Page Photo Credits — All photos courtesy of USFWS unless otherwise noted., Sunrise over Chincoteague - Jacqui Trump.
Last Updated: Apr 25, 2017
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