Fish and Aquatic Conservation
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Since 1871 we have been working to conserve, restore and enhance
fish and other aquatic resources for the continuing benefit of the American people.

Explore 150 years of aquatic conservation


Recent News

Fish biologist checking tag number on a salmon carcass pulled up from the depths of the Sacramento River
Curtis Brownfield, fish biologist for the Service, checks the tag number on a salmon carcass pulled up from the depths of the Sacramento River. Credit: Jake Sisco/USFWS

Counting the dead to account for the living

A summer survey for a winter-run

April 2021

The feel of the wind in your face, the sound of a boat motor roaring down a river, the spray of water, the warm sun on your back and the smell of rotting flesh. This is what the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists on the Sacramento River experience when conducting winter-run Chinook salmon carcass surveys.

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thumbnail image of the cover of the FAC Strategic Plan

map of 12 Interior regions

photo of people fishing off of a pier


Su Jewell holding a Burmese python at Loxahatchee national wildlife refuge
2021 Alison Haskell Award Winner Susan (Su) Jewell

The Alison Haskell Award for Excellence in Herpetofaunal Conservation

March 2021

The award is presented annually by Partners in Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (PARC) in memory of Alison Haskell (1956 – 2006) to recognize an individual in North America who exemplifies extraordinary commitment to herpetofaunal conservation, as did Alison.

The Joint National Steering Committee (JNSC) has selected Susan (Su) Jewell as the recipient of the 2021 Alison Haskell Award for Excellence in Herpetofaunal Conservation.

Read about Su's contributions to herpetofaunal conservation


A zebra mussel nestled inside a moss ball
A zebra mussel nestled inside a moss ball. Photo credit: USGS

Destroy! Don’t Dump!

March 8, 2021

Invasive zebra mussels have recently been found in "moss balls,” an aquarium plant product sold at aquarium and pet supply stores. Zebra mussels are regarded as one of the most destructive invasive species in North America. If you recently purchased moss balls for your aquarium, they must be properly destroyed - don't dump them! Follow the DESTROY, DISPOSE, and DRAIN instructions on our website.

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