Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge protects one of the largest remaining expanses of tidal salt marsh in the mid-Atlantic region.

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National wildlife refuges offer us all a chance to unplug from the stresses of daily life and reconnect with our natural surroundings. Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge protects one of the largest remaining expanses of tidal salt marsh salt marsh
Salt marshes are found in tidal areas near the coast, where freshwater mixes with saltwater.

Learn more about salt marsh
in the mid-Atlantic region. The refuge, located along the coast of Delaware, is mostly marsh, but also includes freshwater wetlands and upland habitats that are managed for other wildlife. 

Location and Contact Information

      About Us

      Bombay Hook was established in 1937 as a link in the chain of refuges extending from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. It is primarily a refuge and breeding ground for migrating birds and other wildlife. The value and importance of Bombay Hook for migratory bird protection and conservation has increased through the years, primarily due to the management of the refuge and the loss of high quality habitat along the Atlantic Flyway. 

      Bombay Hook is a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance. Portions are also designated a research natural area research natural area
      The National Wildlife Refuge System contains 210 research natural areas (RNAs) that are part of a nationwide network of ecological areas set aside for both research and education. The areas "contain important ecological and scientific values and are managed for minimum human disturbance.”…

      Learn more about research natural area
      . The refuge, a nationally recognized birding spot attracting birders from across the country, is designated a Globally Important Bird Area. The Refuge, as well as the entire State of Delaware, is part of the New England/Mid Atlantic Coast Bird Conservation Region Implementation Plan (BCR 30).

      Our Species

      Bald Eagle

      A large raptor, the bald eagle has a wingspread of about seven feet. Adults have a dark brown body and wings, white head and tail, and a yellow beak. Juveniles are mostly brown with white mottling on the body, tail, and undersides of wings. Adult plumage usually is obtained by the sixth year. In...

      FWS Focus
      Northern Diamondback Terrapin
      Northern Diamond-backed Terrapin
      FWS Focus