Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we encourage you to:

  • Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information
  • Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick


Features

Items of Interest

Current Conditions - Phased Reopening

July 8, 2020

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is following federal, state, and local public health authority guidance to implement a phased approach to increase public access to Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge. Public outdoor areas in the refuge will begin opening via a timed reservation system. Timed reservation tickets will be available two months in advance on the first of the month at 7 a.m. HST. Example: On July 1, tickets will be available for the dates of July 1 - August 31. Reservations may be made online up until the designated time of entry, as availability allows.

Plan Your Visit

Restoration and translocation within the Nihoku (Crater Hill) predator-proof area

Completed fence1 thumbnail

The Refuge is using the first predator-proof fenced area on Kaua‘i to keep out mammalian predators, such as cats, dogs, rats, mice, and potentially mongooses, so that native species such as the endangered nēnē (Hawaiian goose), the mōlī (Laysan albatross), and rare plants can flourish again. In addition, the absence of predators make this restored site an appropriate translocation site for the endangered ‘ua‘u (Hawaiian petrel) and threatened ‘a‘o (Newell's shearwater).

Learn more

Management Plan Completed

Final CCP Promo 150x118

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a Comprehensive Conservation Plan that outlines the goals, objectives, and strategies for managing Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. The management plan was developed with input from local, state, and federal governments; local communities; and other stakeholders. The plan emphasizes enhancing coastal ecosystems, restoring seabird breeding populations, conducting monitoring and research, and improving visitor services and environmental education.

Learn more
About Kilauea Point

Welcome to Kīlauea Point

Aerial 59

Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge’s dramatic backdrop of steep cliffs plunging to the ocean is one of the best places on the main Hawaiian Islands to view wildlife, and is also home to some of the largest populations of nesting seabirds found in Hawai'i. Visitors also have a chance to view spinner dolphins, Hawaiian monk seals, native Hawaiian coastal plants and Hawai‘i’s state bird - the nēnē or endangered Hawaiian goose. For information about Lighthouse Tours go to Plan Your Visit below!

Plan Your Visit

About the Complex

Kaua‘i National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Kīlauea Point National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Kaua‘i National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS