Facility Activities

National wildlife refuges offer us all a chance to unplug from the stresses of daily life and reconnect with our natural surroundings. The Kolar Savanna Unit of the refuge provides an opportunity for visitors to experience an oak savanna. You are welcome to birdwatch and explore the woodlands and grasslands. The land is also open to deer and turkey hunting, in accordance with state regulations. When planning a trip to the refuge, it is important to know that there are no facilities located at the Kolar Savanna Unit other than a kiosk with visitor information. 

Archery demonstrations and lessons may be a part of local site programming. Some refuges and hatcheries permit bow-hunting with other hunting. This activity is typically limited. Check locally for how to apply.
From bald eagles to spoonbills, from condors to puffins, birds abound on national wildlife refuges. Refuges provide places for birds to nest, rest, feed and breed making them world-renown for their birding opportunities.
Many refuges in the country's northern tier have backcountry trails that can be used for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing in season. Some refuges lend gear or rent it at low cost.
Many sites do not allow dogs because they can disturb wildlife. Refuges that do allow dogs generally require that they be leashed. Some sites allow hunters and sledders to bring dogs.
Hunting is available at almost 400 national wildlife refuges, more than 35 wetland management districts and almost 20 national fish hatcheries. Hunting is a priority public use at national wildlife refuges. Wildlife hunting is subject to sustainable limits and sometimes used as a management tool to keep wildlife populations in check. Hunters' purchase of Duck Stamps helps buy conservation lands. Hunters must have an appropriate state license.
Painting and sketching in nature is possible at nearly all sites open to the public. Sometimes, sites host public displays of artworks created on the refuge.
Whether you wield a smartphone or a zoom lens, you’ll find photo-worthy subjects at national wildlife refuges and national fish hatcheries. Wildlife photography is a priority public use on national wildlife refuges, so you’ll find wildlife drives and blinds and overlooks to help you get the images you’re after.
Rangers lead wildlife walks, tours and educational programs at many sites. Events may focus on wildflowers or birds or on seasonal spectacles, such as elk bugling or sea turtle nesting. Some programs may be limited in size or require advance registration. See individual websites for details.
Many refuges in the country's northern tier have backcountry trails that can be used for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing in season. Some refuges loan out gear or rent it at low cost.
Many refuges champion wildlife viewing as a key recreational activity.