green plant with purple blossoms
Proposed Listing, Critical Habitat, and 4(d) Rule for Ocmulgee Skullcap

Ocmulgee skullcap, a rare plant found only in the Ocmulgee River and Savannah River watersheds in Georgia and South Carolina, is in decline. Remaining populations are small, contain relatively few individuals, and are scattered across the range, lacking connectivity to one another. To protect Ocmulgee skullcap and its habitat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing protections for the plant under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Species Status Assessment can be found here

Serving South Carolina by conserving our most imperiled species and working with federal agencies to conserve plants, fish, and wildlife.

About Us

Established in 1973 the South Carolina Ecological Services Field Office (SCESFO) covers 46 counties, 31,000 square miles, and 187 miles of general coast line. It works with 13 threatened or endangered animal species, 19 threatened or endangered plant species, and approximately 70 other plant/animal species deemed to be at-risk.

What We Do

The SCESFO works in partnership with South Carolina’s seven national wildlife refuges and two national fish hatcheries. Protecting over 192,000 acres of fish and wildlife habitat and providing exceptional recreational opportunities for the public, these facilities serve as models for effective conservation and recovery of threatened and endangered species and other species of emerging conservation priority. 

Our Organization

The Ecological Services Program works to restore and protect healthy populations of fish, wildlife, and plants and the environments upon which they depend. Using the best available science, we work with federal, state, Tribal, local, and non-profit stakeholders, as well as private land owners, to...

Projects and Research

Working with others is at the core of how we operate, and through those partnerships, we develop a number of conservation projects across South Carolina, from conserving mussels in the upstate, to protecting our coast. Learn more about some of the key efforts we have underway.

Our Library

Get Involved

A fundamental tenet in our approach to conservation is community engagement – from working with private landowners wanting to improve endangered species habitat on their land, to helping non-profits doing on-the-ground work. 

Location and Contact Information