South Carolina’s federally threatened, endangered, and at-risk plant species
Optimal survey windows

Written By

These survey windows were determined using information from species recovery plans, field observations, herbaria specimens, and SC Natural Heritage Program information. If suitable habitat for species is present in the proposed impact area, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will likely request species surveys, conducted by a qualified biologist, during the optimal survey window. Projects are reviewed on a case-by-case-basis and you are encouraged to contact a Section 7 Section 7
Section 7 Consultation The Endangered Species Act (ESA) directs all Federal agencies to work to conserve endangered and threatened species and to use their authorities to further the purposes of the Act. Section 7 of the Act, called "Interagency Cooperation," is the mechanism by which Federal agencies ensure the actions they take, including those they fund or authorize, do not jeopardize the existence of any listed species.

Learn more about Section 7
 coordinator early in the project planning process.

SCIENTIFIC NAME 

COMMON NAME 

STATUS 

SURVEY WINDOW 

Amaranthus pumilus 

seabeach amaranth  

T 

July - October 
(or before first tropical storm that causes overwash) 

Amorpha georgiana var. georgiana 

Georgia lead-plant 

ARS 

late April – October 

Amphianthus pusillus 

little amphianthus or pool sprite 

T 

late March-April 

Balduina atropurpurea 

purple balduina 

ARS 

August – November 

Carex impressinervia 

impressed-nerved sedge 

ARS 

April - May 

Carex lutea 

Golden sedge 

E 

May 

Coreopsis integrifolia 

ciliate-leaf tickseed 

ARS 

August - November 

Dionaea muscipula 

venus flytrap 

ARS 

late May – June 

Echinacea laevigata 

smooth coneflower 

E 

late May – October 

Eupatorium paludicola 

bay boneset 

ARS 

August - September 

Fimbristylis perpusilla 

Harper’s fimbristylis 

ARS 

July – September 

Gymnoderma lineare 

rock gnome lichen 

E 

year round 

Helianthus schweinitzii 

Schweinitz's sunflower 

E 

late August – October 

Helonias bullata 

swamp pink 

T 

April – May 

Hexastylis naniflora 

dwarf-flowered heartleaf 

T 

March – May 

Isoetes melanospora 

Black-spored quillwort 

E 

May – October 

Isotria medeoloides 

small whorled pogonia 

T 

mid May - early July 

Lindera melissifolia 

pondberry 

E 

February – March; 
September - October 

Lindera subcoriacea 

bog spicebush 

ARS 

March - August 

Lobelia boykinii 

Boykin’s Lobelia 

ARS 

May – July 

Ludwigia ravenii 

Raven’s seedbox 

ARS 

June - October 

Lysimachia asperulaefolia 

rough-leaved loosestrife 

E 

mid May – June  

Macbridea caroliniana 

Carolina birds-in-a-nest 

ARS 

July – November 

Minuartia godfreyi 

Godfrey’s stitchwort 

ARS 

April – June 

Narthecium americanum 

bog asphodel 

ARS-C 

June-July 

Oxypolis canbyi 

Canby's dropwort 

E 

Late July – September 

Platanthera integrilabia 

white fringeless orchid 

T 

mid July - September 

Ptilimnium nodosum 

harperella 

E 

July – early September 
(during low water) 

Ribes echinellum 

Miccosukee gooseberry 

T 

June-September 

Rhus michauxii 

Michaux's sumac 

E 

May – October 

Rudbeckia heliopsidis 

sun-facing coneflower 

ARS 

July – September 

Sagittaria fasciculata 

bunched arrowhead 

E 

mid May – July 

Sarracenia purpurea var. montana 

mountain purple pitcher-plant 

ARS 

April – October 

Sarracenia rubra ssp. jonesii 

mountain sweet pitcher-plant 

E 

April – October 

Schwalbea americana 

American chaffseed 

E 

May - August 
(1-2 months after a fire) 

Scutellaria ocmulgee 

ocmulgee skullcap 

ARS 

late June-early October 

Sisyrinchium dichotomum 

white irisette 

E 

late May – July 

Symphyotrichum georgianum 

Georgia aster 

ARS-C 

October - mid November 

Sporobolus teretifolius 

wire-leaved dropseed 

ARS 

July – September 
(following fire) 

Trillium persistens 

persistent trillium 

E 

early March – mid April 

Trillium reliquum 

relic trillium 

E 

mid-March - April 

Tsuga caroliniana 

Carolina hemlock 

ARS 

year round 

For most species survey is good for 3 years. For seabeach amaranth (Amaranthus pumilus) survey is only good for 1 year. 

For additional information, reach out to the South Carolina Field Office

  

Story Tags

Endangered and/or Threatened species
Plants
Surveying