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A forrested stream with rocky shores.

The remaking of Raccoon Creek

May 1, 2018 | 7 minute readBraswell, Georgia – A long and unusually cold Southern winter had the anglers itching to pick up rods and hit Raccoon Creek, one of the southernmost trout streams in the country. First, though, duty called. Nearly 50 retirees, teachers, builders, students and wildlife officials shouldered axes, clippers, shovels and chainsaws and gathered at aptly named Trout Stocking Road for a morning spent scouring the creek’s banks. The local Trout Unlimited members cleared trails, trimmed branches and picked up trash, all the while taking mental notes of pools, riffles and unimpeded casting spots. Learn more...

Raccoon Creek. Photo by Brett Albanese, Georgia DNR.

Three fluffy grey birds appear sleeping in a nest.

A young life saved

April 30, 2018 | 5 minute readWas that fishing line in the nest? A worried eagle watcher clicked on the website’s email link and started writing. Then, a second time: click! The email went winging. It landed in Al Cecere’s inbox. He read it and turned to his computer. Cecere called up the site where two cameras offered unblinking looks at three eaglets born in the top of a Tennessee oak tree. Yes, monofilament. And that meant the 3-week-old bald eagles or their parents were in danger of swallowing the line – or, worse, ingesting a lure or hook. Learn more...

The eaglet and its siblings live in a tree not far from Sevierville, Tennessee. Photo by American Eagle Foundation.

A turtle with a dark shell and orang spots surrounded by fallen leaves

Here, spot!

April 20, 2018The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers spotted turtles at risk of being listed under the Endangered Species Act; they work with the Orianne Society, as well as other organizations, to learn more about the turtle. Learn more...

The spotted turtle's shell makes it a prize in the pet trade. It is illegal to trap the reptile, whose range extends from Maine to Florida. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

Four released birds spread their wings and take flight towards the blue sky.

Taking flight to freedom

April 17, 2018 | 6 minute readAbout 130 birds were released April 14 into Florida’s River of Grass by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials and partners at Everglades National Park headquarters near Homestead, Florida. The birds had been bought by undercover agents from illegal trappers and traffickers, and seized in a series of arrests in the days leading up to the release. Learn more...

Migratory birds take to the skies after being uncaged at Everglades National Park. The birds had been seized as part of Operation Ornery Birds. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

A young hunter crouches while holding a rife in the woods.

Hunting the wild hog

April 9, 2018Codey Elrod has a job most Southern hunters would kill for. Literally. My job,” Elrod said, “is to kill hogs.” And he gets paid for it. Learn more...

Codey Elrod, hog control technician with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

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