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  • Service staff stand under a Chattahoochee Forest NFH tent for an event
    Information icon Welcome tent at the Scout event. Photo by Volunteer Scout Leader.

    Chattahoochee Forest NFH (GA) educates scouts about trout fishing

    January 24, 2020 | 1 minute read

    On Nov., 2019, Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery program assistant Crystal Thomas and volunteer Mike Morton staffed a booth about trout fishing during the 2019 Hornaday Weekend-Atlanta Area Council at the Woodruff Scout Camp in North Georgia. Hundreds of scouts from all over the southeastern United States visited the hatchery booth seeking information about trout fishing, ethics and conservation. Some were seasoned at fishing while others were seeking a first-time experience.  Learn more...

  • A vine grows over a small pond covered in algae and fallen shrub branches
    Information icon Okeechobee gourd vines spreading across the landscape at restoration site. Photo by Rob Hopper, South Florida Water Management District.

    Okeechobee gourd thriving at Everglades restoration site

    January 23, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The endangered Okeechobee gourd got a new home and started the new year, and for that matter, the new decade with a bang. Previous efforts to successfully translocate the gourd and establish new populations were relatively unsuccessful, due to issues that included hydrology, predation, and invasive competition. However, in the summer of 2019, several locations within the Sam Jones/Abiaki Prairie Restoration site south of Lake Okeechobee were planted with the gourd, and today they are thriving.  Learn more...

  • Three young longleaf pine trees growing in a larger forest
    Information icon Young longleaf pine at The Jones Center, also known as Ichauway. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Woodpecker swap meet

    January 13, 2020 | 9 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Will McDearman stood on a chair, raised his voice and beseeched the hundred or so wildlife officials gathered in a nondescript auditorium to offer up every woodpecker they could find. “Are all the birds on the table?” he asked. Murmurs of assent followed. McDearman, like an auctioneer, then ended the bidding that joined woodpecker donor with woodpecker donee. “Going once,” he said. “Going twice,” he said.  Learn more...

  • Learning about aquatic invertebrates

    January 10, 2020 | 1 minute read

    In November 2019, Bears Bluff National Fish Hatchery staff held an aquatic invertebrate diversity lab with four third and fourth grade classes and one gifted and talented class at James B. Edwards Elementary School in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina.  Learn more...

  • Boy scouts walk in a line through a young stand of pine trees.
    Information icon The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America has been helping restore longleaf pine at a camp in North Carolina. Photo by Jacob Jay.

    Planting for the future

    January 8, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Reveille sounds. Long lines of uniformed Boy Scouts circle the flagpole. Pledges and singing follow. Out beyond this morning ritual, stately young longleaf pine trees proudly peek over swaying grasses. The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America is restoring the longleaf pine ecosystem and awakening its rich history at Camp Bowers in eastern North Carolina. They are contributing to the goal of the America’s Longleaf Initiative to bring back an ecosystem that once spanned from Virginia to Texas, and in North Carolina supports unique wildlife such as the Venus flytrap, which is considered at risk in the wild.  Learn more...

  • An upland forest edge after mechanical thinning
    Information icon Grand Bay habitat area after mastication. Photo by USFWS.

    Deepwater Horizon settlement Funds help Mississippi coastal habitats

    December 17, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Habitat management activities are well underway on the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Grand Bay Land Acquisition and Habitat Management Project.  Learn more...

  • New maps aid conservation in Louisiana

    December 16, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Recent revisions to a federal report on the nation’s wetlands indicate that coastal areas are losing wetlands more quickly than the rest of the nation — none more so than those along the Gulf of Mexico. The rate of the loss appears to be accelerating, too. Among the findings: beginning in 2004, an estimated 5% of all saltmarsh habitat vanished to open waters along the Gulf of Mexico during a 4½-year period.  Learn more...

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