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  • A man with a beard and a woman, both wearing glasses, smile for the camera at an outdoor event.
    Information icon Cheryl and Ron Babers Hagar have dedicated their retirement years to transforming 400 acres that have been in Cheryl’s family for four generations into a wildlife-friendly habit. Photo by Courtesy Cheryl and Ron Babers Hagar.

    An investment in wildlife

    December 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Cheryl Babers Hagar has never seen a red-cockaded woodpecker. Nor has she seen a Louisiana pinesnake, although if she sees one of those, she says she would prefer it to be with some distance between her and the reptile.  Learn more...

  • Several dozen children pose for a photo in front of a sign that reads "Eco Conservation Field Day"
    Information icon 4th grade students from Russell Springs Elementary School. Photo by Moria Painter, USFWS.

    Outdoor Eco Day Success at Wolf Creek NFH

    November 20, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Crisp autumn weather is the perfect setting for a day spent learning about Environmental Education in the great outdoors. For 229 fourth graders from Russell County Elementary schools enjoyed the annual Outdoor Eco Day hosted by Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery (NFH) and the Friends of Wolf Creek NFH, Inc. on October 25. Students arrived by bus in the early morning hours, departing the bus at the visitor center and traveling by foot to nine different stations located on hatchery grounds.  Learn more...

  • Two participants show off their catch of eight trout on the bank of Hatchery Creek.
    Information icon The couple who fish together, stays together. Photo by Mackenzie Foster, USFWS.

    Smiles abound at Wolf Creek for the 12th annual Catch a Smile Senior Fishing Derby

    November 20, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery and the Friends of Wolf Creek NFH hosted the 12th Annual Catch a Smile Senior fishing derby on Sept. 24, 2019. Over 190 seniors, age 62 and over enjoyed the fun-filled day. Big fish! Equal even Bigger smiles! Photo by Mackenzie Foster, USFWS. Participants enjoyed a lunch of grilled hamburgers, hotdogs, chips, drinks and desserts. Each participant took home a door prize, provided by local sponsors, that included camp lights, camp chairs, camp coffee pots, flashlights, fishing gear, and many other items.  Learn more...

  • A small, fuzzy, brown bat baring teeth in the hands of a biologist
    Information icon Northern long-eared bat captured in Bladen County, NC. Photo by Gary Jordan, USFWS.

    Aiding the northern long-eared bat

    November 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Bats provide valuable ecosystem services that impact the world’s economy and our lives. They pollinate cash crops and forests, disperse seeds, produce fertilizer and control pests by devouring insects. Many bat species are in decline, however, due to habitat loss and disease, especially white-nose syndrome (WNS). The Service has been working with partners promoting conservation, research and innovation to fight back at the national level. In the eastern half of the U.  Learn more...

  • A bright white bird with a red patch on its head and identifying tags on its legs wads through a marsh
    Information icon Whooping crane, L4-17 at Holla Bend NWR. Photo courtesy of Ronald Duvall.

    Female whooping crane visits Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge

    November 15, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Arkansas’ Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge is hosting a Louisiana reared whooping crane. The first observation of the crane on the refuge was October 3. According to Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries biologist Sara Zimorski, this crane is a 2 1⁄2-year-old female that was released in 2017. Whooping crane, L4-17 at Holla Bend NWR. Photo courtesy of Ronald Duvall. Unlike most of the juveniles released at the same time, she took off immediately, has spent more time outside of Louisiana than in it, and has covered a lot of ground in two years.  Learn more...

  • Exploring my roots blossomed into helping others track their family histories

    November 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    One of the great benefits of working for the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service is its belief in work-life balance, allowing employees to pursue our own interests outside the office and providing the flexibility to take the time off needed to pursue these interests. My interest is in genealogy.  Learn more...

  • Partnerships work toward conservation of two Puerto Rico plants

    November 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s, Caribbean Ecological Services Field Office has been collaborating with the British institution the Royal Botanic Garden, Kew, for nearly a decade to define and implement sound conservation efforts aimed toward the recovery of Puerto Rico’s threatened and endangered plant species. This collaboration seeks to build capacity and to promote communication and exchange of knowledge between Puerto Rican and international institutions, including the University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez (UPRM), Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (PRDNER), the University of Portsmouth, the National Parks Trust of the British Virgin Islands (BVI), Vieques National Wildlife Refuge, and the Service.  Learn more...

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