Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District was establish in 1963 when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service began acquiring critical migratory waterfowl habitat in southeastern Nebraska. The ancestral homelands of the Pawnee (Pâri) and the Jiwere, this geographic area, called the Rainwater Basin, is a complex of wetlands scattered throughout a 21-county area. Today, 63 individual Waterfowl Production Areas have been purchased, most of them with funds generated from the sale of the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, more commonly known as the Duck Stamp.

Visit Us

Rainwater Basin Wetland Management District's 61 Waterfowl Production Areas provide numerous recreational opportunities such as birding, wildlife observation, hunting, and photography to thousands of visitors every year. 

Location and Contact Information

      About Us

      The indigenous homelands of the Pawnee (Pâri) and the Jiwere, this geographic area, called the Rainwater Basin, is a complex of wetlands scattered throughout a 21-county area. The wetlands are shallow basins that provide resting and feeding areas for millions on birds during spring and fall migration.

      What We Do

      The management goal of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service within the Rainwater Basin is to restore, as much as possible, the natural hydrologic and ecological function of wetlands for the benefit of migratory birds and resident wildlife. For the grasslands, our goal is to reestablish and maintain diverse native grassland communities.

      Our Species

      Rainwater Basin is known internationally for its significance to migratory birds. Millions of birds funnel into the Basin on their northward migration each spring. The more impressive species, by their sheer numbers, are white-fronted geese, mallards, pintails, snow geese, and sandhill cranes.