Features

  • Brown booby rotator

    Brown Booby

    The brown booby makes dramatic sky dives to catch parrot fish, mullet and flatfish foraging 30 to 50 feet below the ocean surface.

    Brown Booby

  • Masked booby rotator

    Masked Booby

    While rarely sighted in North America an average of 30 pairs a year nest on Palmyra Atoll.

    Masked Booby

  • Red-footed booby rotator

    Red-footed Booby

    This booby's next meal is completely dependent upon the existence of schools of tuna that push prey fish near the surface of the ocean.

What's New

Seeking Volunteers!

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking two volunteers available from early June through September 2018 to perform vegetation control and biological monitoring efforts at Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge.

Palmyra 2018 Volunteer Announcement

Marine Predators and Coral Reef Growth

Marine Predators and Coral Reef Growth

Researchers from Imperial College of London and University of California Santa Barbara study the vital role of marine predators in supplying nutrients to coral reef ecology working in the waters around Palmyra Atoll NWR

UCSB Study

News From the Refuge

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Check out the latest updates and happenings from around the Refuge

News

The Marvelous Musical Report!

Starring a business man, giant clams, a young child, hydro-thermal vents, seabirds by the millions, sharks by the tens, ridiculously colored fish and coral, coconut crabs that climb trees and last but not least a baby! A not-to-be missed musical environmental and cultural assessment featuring the Papahānaumokuākea, the Rose Atoll, the Pacific Remote Islands and the Marianas Trench Marine National Monuments.

Check it Out!
Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument

Protecting Islands and our Pacific Ocean

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Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and six other national wildlife refuges are seemingly just dots near the equator of the Pacific Ocean, but upon a closer look these islands, reefs, and atolls are at the epicenter of Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, one of the largest marine conservation areas in the world. These refuges host terrestrial and marine life in numbers and unique and specialized life forms beyond our imagination and they provide a safe haven for millions of birds and marine life that swarm to shallow areas and islands to rest, to feed, to mate, and to give life to their off-spring.

Learn More

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Marine Monuments Program

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Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is managed by the Fish & Wildlife Service in the Marine Monuments Program of the Pacific Islands Refuges and Monuments Office (PIRAMO). For more information contact: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service/Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, Box 50167, Honolulu, HI 96850 808-792-9540.

Marine Monuments and Wildlife Refuges of the Central Pacific Ocean

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS