Features

  • Midway Aerial and Dive Bombers

    Midway 75 Commemoration

    On June 5, 2017 we commemorated the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Midway. Learn more at midway75.org

    Battle of Midway Commemoration Film

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    Wisdom Prevails!

    The world's oldest known wild bird at 67+ hatched yet another chick! Follow her story as it unfolds!

    Follow Wisdom's Family

  • Battle of Midway 75th anniversary

    Honoring Those Who Served

    Colonel John F. Miniclier and Sergeant Edgar R Fox being honored at during the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Midway on June 5, 2017.

    Remembering the Battle of Midway

  • Native Plants Come Home

    Native Plants!

    Nai de Garcia assures a diversity of native plants survive from seed to field to help nature reestablish Midway's native seed bank.

Ensuring Midway's Historic and Wildlife Legacy

Public Comment Period for Draft EA for Seawall Repair

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) propose a plan to replace and repair failing seawall on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial. Repairing sections of the deteriorating seawall will protect critical airfield operations necessary for refuge and monument management and to protect wildlife from entrapment. The Service and FAA are seeking public comments on the draft Environmental Assessment and proposed plan. The 30-day public comment period is open from May 2nd to May 31st, 2018.

Link to Draft Midway Seawall EA

Wisdom has done it AGAIN!

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At 67, Wisdom, the world’s oldest known breeding bird in the wild, is a mother once more! In early February, approximately two months after Wisdom began incubating her egg, Wisdom and her mate Akeakamai welcomed their newest chick to Midway Atoll! Photo credit: Naomi Blinick/USFWS Volunteer

More about Wisdom

Our Partners in Conservation

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Check-out the latest from our non-feathered Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge/Battle of Midway National Memorial!

Friends of Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

Honoring Midway's Cultural and Natural Heritage

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Pihemanu is a Hawaiian word for "loud din of birds" and Kuaihelani means "back bone of heaven." Both are place names for Midway Atoll within Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. The Monument's intrinsic cultural values assured it was inscribed as a World Heritage Site for both its cultural and natural heritage. The four designated trustees of the Monument will continue this voyage together to protect one of the largest protected areas on earth.

Learn more
Battle of MidwayNational Memorial

Battle of Midway National Memorial

Monument

In 2000 Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge was designated the Battle of Midway National Memorial, so that the heroic courage and sacrifice of those who fought against overwhelming odds to win an incredible victory will never be forgotten.

Learn more

Refuge Closure

Refuge Closure

Please be advised that Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge and Battle of Midway National Memorial is currently closed to public visitation. Only activities that directly support airfield operations and conservation management of the Refuge/Memorial and the Monument are allowed. However, we encourage you to virtually visit the Refuge by exploring the options below.

Visiting the Refuge

Refuge Virtual Visitation

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Virtual online experiences and resources can help one visit Midway's spectacular resources. Click the link below for more information.

Ways to Virtually Visit the Refuge

Contractors and Agency Partners

Administrative Fee Schedule

Schedule of Fees for Services Rendered for Contractors and Agency Partners

Henderson Field Fee Schedule

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS