Features

  • Wildflower Galleries

    Wildflower Galleries

    It may be arid, but the Monument comes alive in the spring with wildflowers. Here are some of our most colorful.

    Wildflower Galleries

  • Little Brown Myotis

    Hanford Bats

    Legend. Myths. Folklore. Bats figure prominently in our primal fears, the things that scare us in the chill dark of the night. Are we silly!

    Bats

  • Sage Thrasher

    Rare Species

    "The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What good is it?'" – Aldo Leopold, Round River

    Rare, Threatened or Endangered Species

  • Monarch Butterfly

    Insects

    The Monument is paradise for entomologists. Especially lepidopterans. You have to find out what that means.

    Insects

  • Elk Viewing

    Elk

    What do visitors want to see? The White Bluffs, of course. Coyotes, deer and birds have their fans. But everyone wants to see the massive elk found here.

    Elk

Halloween

Screech At The Reach

October 25, 2019 Bats

Scared of spiders? Terrified of toads? Bewitched by bats? You shouldn't be, and we're happy to tell you why. Join us at for Screech At The Reach at the Hanford Reach Interpretive Center (1943 Columbia Park Trail, Kennewick) to explore the myths and truths about the creatures of Halloween. Blue Mountain Wildlife will be on with live owls. Experts will be on hand to talk about Halloween creatures, or the Monument itself. Face painting. Live bugs. Children’s activities. The Reach will be open from 6:30 until 8:00 p.m. Normal admission fees apply.

Ravens & Halloween

Raven Promo

Of course, everyone knows owls, wolves, bats and spiders are part of Halloween folklore and celebrations, but maybe you didn’t realize that ravens and toads are also deeply associated with the holiday. On the Monument, you can find everything but wolves. If you’d like to explore just a bit of the myths and legends about ravens, follow the link below. By the way, toads are often the familiars (servants) of witches in folklore.

Ravens & Mythology

Help Save Our Bats

Save Our Bats Logo

White-nose Syndrome is a horrible disease threatening our bats—bats critical to our environment and food supply. If you like tequila, mangoes, guavas, or any of over 300 other fruits, take the time to learn what you can do to help the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—and yourself!

White-nose Syndrome
Slow Down

Watch For Wildlife

Bunny

The days are turning shorter and the nights colder. Fall is the time of year when wildlife is on the move, preparing for a difficult winter. While winters in the Columbia Basin aren’t that stressful to wildlife, nonetheless creatures here follow the natural instincts of their kind everywhere and are on the move preparing for winter. This is also the time of year when young are dispersing, leaving their birthplace to find territories of their own. Drivers need to slow down and keep a constant watch for wildlife. Haven’t you noticed more dead animals along the road lately? There’s always an upswing of wildlife-vehicle collisions in the fall. So, if getting home 23 seconds sooner is worth squashing a squirrel, mangling a marmot, bashing a beaver, or demolishing a deer, then by all means, keep driving like a maniac.

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Hanford Reach National Monument is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS