Features

  • Wildflower Galleries

    Wildflower Galleries

    It may be arid, but the Monument comes alive in the spring with wildflowers. Here are some of our most colorful.

    Wildflower Galleries

  • Little Brown Myotis

    Hanford Bats

    Legend. Myths. Folklore. Bats figure prominently in our primal fears, the things that scare us in the chill dark of the night. Are we silly!

    Bats

  • Sage Thrasher

    Rare Species

    "The last word in ignorance is the man who says of an animal or plant: 'What good is it?'" – Aldo Leopold, Round River

    Rare, Threatened or Endangered Species

  • Monarch Butterfly

    Insects

    The Monument is paradise for entomologists. Especially lepidopterans. You have to find out what that means.

    Insects

  • Elk Viewing

    Elk

    What do visitors want to see? The White Bluffs, of course. Coyotes, deer and birds have their fans. But everyone wants to see the massive elk found here.

    Elk

Of Special Interest

Baby, It’s Hot Outside

Hot Rabbit

It surprises a lot of people that the “Evergreen State” of Washington is largely arid—and it gets hot, often into triple digits for long stretches. We can beat the heat by heading to air conditioning. However, the animals of the Hanford Reach National Monument don't have that luxury. How do they cope?

Beating The Heat

Ospreys & Baling Twine

Osprey In Nest

Osprey are common along our rivers and lakes—anywhere there is water and fish. Unlike most other birds, they make little attempt to hide their nests, making it easy to follow a nest from egg laying right through the young leaving the nest to fend for themselves. Unfortunately, the manner in which ospreys build their nests clashes with our propensity to litter. In the wild, ospreys often line their nests with lichens, mosses and grasses. However, they will readily use substitute materials, which, sadly, often means baling twine and fishing line. The problem is it can kill them. All too often, they become entangled in the line, suffering gruesome deaths by strangulation or starvation. Researchers at the University of Montana estimate that as much as 10 to 30 percent of osprey chicks and adults in some areas are killed by this baling twine, fish nets, or fishing line. Every year, we’re called to rescue an entangled osprey, but we often arrive too late, or don’t have the resources to pull off a rescue. Many utility companies, such as the Benton REA, have been wonderful partners in helping us rescue ospreys, but we really need your help. When you’re outside, pick up any twine, rope, fishing line, etc.—you may just be saving one of these magnificent birds from a cruel death.

University of Montana Osprey Project
Watching Wildlife

Watching Wildlife

Watching Wildlife

Want to see more animals on your trip to the Hanford Reach National Monument? Here are some tips from the "experts."

Watching Wildlife

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Hanford Reach National Monument is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS