Around the Refuge

Deer Hunts

Hunters

The application process for deer hunting at Eastern Neck is changing this year.

Find out more.

Visitor Activities

Archery on the refuge - USFWS.

There are activities for the whole family year-round at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge including fishing, hunting, environmental education, wildlife viewing and photography. Check out our Visitor Activities page to learn more.

Visitor Activities

Get Involved

Volunteers on the refuge - USFWS.

The refuge draws a lot of strength and support from our volunteers. People have contributed a couple hours a month to nearly a hundred hours a month. Every piece counts to make a refuge whole. Check out the Get Involved page to learn about ways to volunteer at the refuge.

Get Involved
What's Happening

Refuge is Open! Visitors are invited to participate in hunting, fishing, bird watching and other wildlife-dependent activities at Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge.

Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1962 for the primary purposes of migratory birds, threatened and endangered species, and other native species. Approximately 2,286 acres, Eastern Neck NWR is important migratory and overwintering habitat for thousands of waterfowl, including over 500 tundra swans. Over 70,000 visitors come to the refuge annually to observe wildlife and walk the five trails and two boardwalks. The refuge hosts deer hunting and a mentored youth turkey hunt, and is a popular fishing spot. Two county parks, including a popular boat launch, are at the end of the refuge. The refuge has 68 volunteers and an active Friends group.

About the Complex

Chesapeake Marshlands NWR Complex

Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Chesapeake Marshlands NWR Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS