What We Do

The National Wildlife Refuge System is a series of lands and waters owned and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Wildlife conservation is at the heart of the refuge system. It drives everything we do from the purpose a refuge is established, to the recreational activities offered there, to the resource management tools we use. Selecting the right tools helps us ensure the survival of local plants and animals and helps fulfill the purpose of the refuge.

Management and Conservation

Refuges deploy a host of scientifically sound management tools to address biological challenges. These tools  all aim at ensuring a balanced conservation approach to benefit both wildlife and people. The Charles M. Russell Wetland Management District covers five counties in central Montana. It includes four unstaffed satellite refuges and five Waterfowl Production Areas. Management actions are similar across the District and our conservation toolbox includes prescribed fire, prescribed grazing, and invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
management.

Our Services

At this field station we offer the following public services:

In the United States, the Prairie Pothole Region is located within the northern Great Plains in parts of Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Characterized by thousands of shallow, glacially formed wetlands known as potholes, the Prairie Pothole Region provides habitat for...

In the United States, the Prairie Pothole Region is located within the northern Great Plains in parts of Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Characterized by thousands of shallow wetlands known as potholes, the Prairie Pothole Region provides habitat for globally...

Law Enforcement

Federal Wildlife Officers promote the survival of species and health of the environment by ensuring that wildlife laws are followed. They also welcome visitors, and are often the first U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees encountered by the public on refuges. Federal Wildlife Officers are entrusted with protecting natural resources, visitors and employees on National Wildlife Refuge System lands.

Laws and Regulations

Management actions on national wildlife refuges are bound by many mandates including laws and executive orders.