Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you Recreate Responsibly.

  • Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information.
  • Operations vary based on local public health conditions.
  • Consistent with CDC recommendations, people who are not fully vaccinated must continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces.
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick and continue to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and follow CDC guidance on how to protect yourself and others.


Features

  • Current Refuge Closures

    In keeping with guidance from the CDC, we postponed reopening the visitor center for the season.

    Learn More

  • monarch_caterpillar

    Have Monarchs Arrived at Your House?

    Keep your eyes peeled. A great citizen science project tracks monarchs moving north. Report when you see the first butterfly, egg or larva.

    Track their progress.

  • Common loon with chicks on its back by Dan Irizarry

    Seney National Wildlife Refuge

    This three-minute introduction to the refuge contains footage from the Seney Natural History Association film, "The Wonder of Nature.”

    Introduction to Seney National Wildlife Refuge

  • Yellow-rumped Warbler

    Like us on Facebook

    Join us on Facebook and stay up to date on what is happening at the refuge.

    Like us on Facebook

  • Youth in the Outdoors - Stream Safari

    Seney Natural History Association

    The Seney Natural History Association is the non-profit group that helps the refuge put on special events, hire interns, and much more!

    Seney Natural History Association

News

Public comments are being accepted on infrastructure improvements at Seney National Wildlife Refuge

Bridge

We at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are excited to break ground on a backlog of infrastructure projects at the Seney National Wildlife Refuge thanks to funding provided in the Great American Outdoors Act. The refuge was established in 1935 during the Civilian Conservation Corps and Works Progress Administration Era. From the 1930s to the 1960s many facilities and structures were built. We understand the importance of preserving the history of the site and have proposed Seney National Wildlife Refuge be made a Historic District. We are proposing a number of major infrastructure project in 2021 and 2022. Many of these projects will potentially affect some of the newly declared historic properties within the refuge. Comments will be accepted until June 25, 2021.

Press Release - Public Comments on Infrastructure Improvements

Tour Seney Refuge

Tour Seney Refuge App

Would you like a guided tour of the refuge? Discover facts about the refuge's wildlife, management practices, history and more. We hope you enjoy!

Tour Seney Refuge

Recent Sightings and Guides

Ruffed Grouse

Are you wondering what you will see while visiting the Seney National Wildlife Refuge? Check our Recent Sightings and Guides page to see sightings recorded by staff and visitors using eBird or iNaturalist. Electronic field guides specific to the refuge can also be found here.

Recent Sightings and Guides

Whitefish Point Unit

Snowy Owl eating Grebe by Sara D'Angelo

The Whitefish Point Unit (53 acres) of Seney National Wildlife Refuge is located about 11 miles north of Paradise, Michigan. The unit is a stop-over for birds migrating to and from Canada.

Whitefish Point Unit
Whitefish Point Unit

Whitefish Point Unit

Snowy Owl eating Grebe by Sara D'Angelo

The Whitefish Point Unit (53 acres) of Seney National Wildlife Refuge is located about 11 miles north of Paradise, Michigan. The unit is a stop-over for birds migrating to and from Canada.

Whitefish Point Unit

About the Complex

Seney National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Seney National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Seney National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS