Facility Activities

Seney National Wildlife Refuge offers visitors a chance to get outside and explore the northwoods and waters. Stop in the visitor center, take a walk on one of our trails, bike the backroads, bring your camera, grab a fishing pole and see if you can catch a pike or perch or try hunting.

During 2022 several of our bridges on the Marshland Wildlife Drive and Fishing Loop will be repaired or replaced. The construction on the bridges is expected to take most of the season. This will cause closures. Check back for updates as May 15 draws closer. 

Marshland Wildlife Drive...

Hiking and biking are wonderful ways to see the refuge. Unless otherwise stated, all refuge roads are open to bikers and hikers. The refuge manager may close some areas during peak bird migration, due to maintenance or management activities or safety concerns such as high winds, wildfire or...

Seney National Wildlife Refuge provides habitat for over 200 species of birds. Many people visit the refuge with hopes of seeing the elusive yellow rail or black-backed woodpecker. Others enjoy coming to the refuge to see favorites including common loons, trumpeter swans, bald eagles, osprey and...

Motorized boating is only allowed on the Manistique River.

Paddling is only allowed in select areas.

Enjoy a day of paddling along the Manistique River which flows through the southeastern portion of the refuge. Outfitters are in Germfask and will rent boats or provide a shuttle upon request. Use is limited to daylight hours with no overnight...

Camping is permitted by deer hunters during the rifle deer season from Nov. 13 to Dec. 1. on select areas of the refuge. See our hunting regulations for more informaion.

Cross-country skiers are welcome to break their own trails anywhere on the refuge. However, if you prefer an easier glide, the Northern Hardwoods Cross-country Ski Area offers ten miles of groomed Nordic trails. Trails are groomed on Thursdays or Fridays as conditions allow. Turn west off M-77...

Your furry family members are welcome to be walked on leash at the refuge. Please remember to take their waste with you when you go, we are a leave no trace facility.

Leashes are important for our furry friends, they help keep the wildlife safe from your pet and your pet safe from the...

While traditional geocaching (the burial or removal of "treasure") is generally not permitted at national wildlife refuges because it disturbs wildlife habitat, virtual geocaching may be allowed. In this variant, GPS coordinates lead to points of interest, such as cultural sites or exhibits,...

The refuge welcomes school groups and others interested in environmental education. School field trips and classroom visits are accommodated through tours, hikes, pond studies, games and talks. To schedule a field trip, contact the visitor services manager.

Staff at the refuge also...

Available species are northern pike, yellow perch, brown bullhead, sunfish, largemouth and smallmouth bass and brook and brown trout. Fishing is permitted during daylight hours only. Ice fishing is permitted Jan. 1 to Feb. 28 and summer fishing, May 15 to Sept. 30.

Seney National...

Hiking and biking are wonderful ways to see the refuge. Unless otherwise stated, all refuge roads are open to bikers and hikers. The refuge manager may close some areas during peak bird migration, due to maintenance or management activities or safety concerns such as high winds, wildfire or...

Migratory bird hunting, upland game hunting and big game hunting were expanded in 2015. The Upper Peninsula of Michigan has some of the most storied and traditional hunting camp traditions in the country, with hunters often erecting canvas tents and large cook stoves in the middle of the big...

Painting and sketching in nature is possible at nearly all sites open to the public. Sometimes, sites host public displays of artworks created on the refuge.

Perhaps the fastest growing activity on national wildlife refuges is wildlife photography. You don’t need to purchase expensive equipment or have any experience to get started. A small camera or smartphone phone will do just fine for most visitors. Several apps have been developed in recent...

Seney National Wildlife Refuge allows picnicking in various areas.

The refuge offers a variety of programs throughout the year. 

Many multi-purpose trails are open to runners and joggers as well as walkers and, in some cases, bicyclists. Some sites host annual fun runs. Check individual refuge websites for details.

Antlers must be natural sheds, the removal of antlers that have been sawed or still attached to a skull is prohibited. The harvest limit is 2 antlers per person per day.

Snowshoeing is permitted anywhere on the refuge, except on groomed ski trails. Crossing the pools is not recommended as thin ice conditions may exist.

Trapping is carefully managed to ensure safety and the sustainability of wildlife populations. Permitted trapping on refuges typically mirrors state regulations, and trappers who access refuge lands for recreation must possess state licenses and follow state regulations as well as permit...

Foragers may enjoy picking mushrooms or berries at the refuge. Raspberries, blueberries, huckleberries, cherries and other wild fruits help satisfy your sweet tooth. Morels, chanterelle, boletes and other edible mushrooms, in contrast to fruits, offer savory flavors. Some mushrooms and berries...

The refuge is a great place to watch wildlife and is a designated Important Bird Area for several species. Each year, visitors from around the world come to the refuge. The auto tour provides people of all ages and abilities an excellent opportunity to observe wildlife. You may choose to walk...