The Southern Appalachian Spruce Restoration Initiative (SASRI) is a partnership of diverse interests with a common goal of restoring spruce ecosystems across the high elevation landscapes of the Southern Blue Ridge.

It is comprised of private, state, federal, and non-governmental organizations which recognize the importance of this ecosystem for its ecological, aesthetic, recreational, economic, and cultural values. The SASRI collaborative network determined a need to create a Southern Appalachian Spruce Restoration Plan at its annual meeting in August of 2013. While this document is not a regulatory document, nor does it create a mandate for action on any lands, we hope that it will serve as a guidepost for restoration and a benchmark for success. Therefore, the plan lays out an overarching goal followed by four supporting objectives. Additionally, the plan is designed to encourage future updates based on additional information and refining of targets.

Learn more at southernspruce.org

Contact Information

Female biologist sitting on forest floor searching through moss
Fish and wildlife biologist
Ecological Services
Expertise
Terrestrial animals - endangered species listing and recovery; ,
State coordinator of the Endangered Species Act state grant program
Area
NC
Asheville,NC
Male biologist standing before students, hand raised in the air
Deputy Field Office Supervisor and public affairs specialist
Ecological Services
Additional Role(s)
Public Affairs Specialist
Expertise
Communications,
Western North Carolina
Area
NC
Asheville,NC

Species

Programs

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The Ecological Services Program works to restore and protect healthy populations of fish, wildlife, and plants and the environments upon which they depend. Using the best available science, we work with federal, state, Tribal, local, and non-profit stakeholders, as well as private land owners, to...

Facilities

Green plant with a small white flower
Serving western North Carolina and southern Appalachia by conserving our most imperiled species and working with federal agencies to conserve plants, fish, and wildlife.