Our mission is conserving and restoring healthy populations of native fish and other aquatic species, and protecting the lakes, rivers, and wetlands where they live.

About Us

We are working to restore lake sturgeon, lake trout and other native fish and their habitats in the Great Lakes, Finger Lakes, and the Allegheny River watersheds. We are also working to prevent the spread of invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
in these watersheds and the New York State Canal System. 

What We Do

The Lower Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office works to restore and protect the quantity and quality of habitat for fish within the Lake Erie and Lake Ontario watersheds. We restore important habitat and fish connectivity between streams, rivers and lakes. Our projects improve water quality, help increase abundance of fish, and sustain the economic and recreational benefits derived from fishing and recreating in our public waters.

Our Organization

The Fish and Aquatic Conservation program leads aquatic conservation efforts for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We are committed to tackling the nation’s highest priority aquatic conservation and recreational challenges to conserve, restore, and enhance fisheries for future generations.
The Urban Wildlife Conservation Program improves lives by expanding access to green space, education and outdoor recreation for Americans living in and around cities. Program members work to clear social and historical barriers and foster new connections that advance conservation and strengthen...
The Fish Passage Program works with local communities on a voluntary basis to restore rivers and conserve our nation’s aquatic resources by removing or bypassing barriers. Our projects benefit both fish and people.
The National Fish Habitat Partnership is a comprehensive effort to treat the causes of fish habitat decline, not just the symptoms. The Partnership is a national investment strategy to maximize the impact of conservation dollars on the ground. Funds are leveraged through regional partnerships to...

Our Species

  • Lake sturgeon
  • Lake trout
  • Cisco
  • Brook trout

Projects and Research

Our office consists of five primary programs: Native Species, Aquatic Invasive Species, and  Aquatic Habitat Restoration. These programs are supported by the Science and Technology and Outreach and Education programs. We work with state and local partners to restore habitat for fish and wildlife. We also target habitat restoration at road-stream crossings which are subject to frequent flooding, and provide technical support in removing obsolete dams that are unsafe and barriers to fish passage. We also work with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Geological Service, Canada and tribal nations to study native Great Lakes fish and respond to new invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
.

Visit Us

We are collocated at the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, where there are a variety of recreational opportunities, such as fishing, paddling, hiking, birding, and wildlife watching. Come visit us for some quality time outdoors or check out our 400 gallon freshwater tank at the Visitor Center located on Casey Road between Route 77 and Route 63.

 

Our Library

Our staff publish research and articles available for reading. Here are some of our current publications:

Incorporation of non-native species in the diets of cisco (Coregonus artedi) from eastern Lake Ontario - Journal of Great Lakes Research

Evidence of successful river spawning by lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in the Lower Niagara River, Lake Ontario - Journal of Great Lakes Research

Get Involved

Discover for yourself what tens of thousands of volunteers have learned: Volunteering for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is fun and rewarding in many ways. Master new skills. Meet new friends. Enjoy a sense of accomplishment from doing your part to further wildlife conservation for the pleasure of generations to follow. Check out our station's latest volunteer opportunities on volunteer.gov.  We can accommodate a few volunteers per season, whether they are official internships for school credit or just looking for the experience.

Location and Contact Information