Projects and Research

Our office consists of five primary programs: Native Species, Aquatic Invasive Species, and  Aquatic Habitat Restoration which are supported by our Science and Technology and Outreach and Education programs. We work closely with state and local governments including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, universities, and watershed groups like Buffalo Niagara Waterkeeper. We also work with other agencies from the United States, Canada and tribal nations like the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Geological Service. Working with these partners we monitor and study native Great Lakes fish, monitor and respond to new invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
, and improve or restore habitat for fish and wildlife.  In addition to our base agency charge, the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative also provides funding and technical support to carry out these programs in Lake Erie and Lake Ontario.

Native fish species, such as lake sturgeon, lake trout, and various native preyfish , inhabit the lower Great Lakes basin. The office, in cooperation with state and provincial agencies, works toward the protection and management of these native fish species. Native species activities include conducting fish community surveys; assessing fish population size, age distribution, growth and...

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are non-native (exotic) organisms, which are detrimental to native ecosystems due to their explosive range expansions and competition for food and habitat. Non-native species introductions may be intentional (stocking) or unintentional (bait, boats, canals). The office coordinates the Northeast Region AIS Program, which includes three components: coordination/...

Habitat degradation and loss have contributed to the decline of native species throughout the Great Lakes. The coastal waters and watersheds of the Great Lakes are comprised of a variety of wetland and riparian habitat types essential to animals and plants, including many rare, threatened and endangered species. The Aquatic Habitat Restoration Program provides technical and financial...

The Lower Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office maintains an advanced geospatial services program for the support of on-going fisheries and habitat restoration activities. The program is the combination of hardware, software, data, people, and techniques used to better understand the patterns and relationships of spatial, biological, and physical information. Geospatial services...