Conserving the Nature of America
Press Release
Service Seeks Input as it Prepares to Update the Mexican Wolf 2015 Revised Nonessential Experimental Population Designation

April 14, 2020

Contact(s):

Aislinn Maestas, aislinn_maestas@fws.gov, 505-248-6599


Mexican wolf in the snow. Credit: USFWS

Mexican wolf in the snow. Credit: USFWS.

ALBUQUERQUE, New Mexico – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is soliciting input from the public as it begins preparing a supplemental environmental impact statement (sEIS) on its 2015 revision to the nonessential experimental population of Mexican wolf. The scoping process gives citizens an opportunity to provide input on the range of issues that will be addressed in the sEIS.

On March 31, 2018, the District Court of Arizona remanded portions of the 2015 final rule to revise the designation of the Mexican Wolf Experimental Population Area in Arizona and New Mexico. The ruling directs the Service to redress several components of the rule to ensure the experimental population contributes to long-term Mexican wolf conservation and recovery. To comply with the remand, the Service must publish a revised, final rule by May 1, 2021. The geographic boundaries of the experimental population will not be altered by this action.

The Service is collaborating with states, tribes and other stakeholders to conserve and recover the Mexican wolf. Using science-based efforts, the partners can achieve recovery for the species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and work towards future management by the states and tribes.

“The public scoping process is an important step in informing interested parties and gathering their input,” said Brady McGee, Mexican Wolf Recovery Coordinator. “Their comments will help us refine the scope of the supplemental EIS and identify significant issues to be analyzed in depth.”

Nonessential experimental populations are designated under section 10(j) of the ESA as a means to reintroduce a listed species to part of its former range without imposing all the restrictions the ESA mandates in other areas where the species occurs.

Revising the 2015 rule requires a reanalysis of specific aspects of the 2014 Environment Impact Statement for the Proposed Revision to the Regulations for the Nonessential Experimental Population of the Mexican Wolf (Canis lupus baileyi). The Service tomorrow will publish a Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare the draft sEIS and conduct public scoping in the Federal Register, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act. The Service will be working with its partners and other cooperating agencies on the EIS supplement.

The NOI initiates a 60-day comment period for the public to review and comment on any of the topics to be addressed in the EIS supplement. The NOI will be available at https://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/listing10j.html.

Comments can be submitted electronically at http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments to Docket No. FWS-R2-ES-2020-0007, which is the docket number for this Notice of Intent. Hard copy comments can be submitted by U.S. mail or hand-delivery to: Public Comments Processing, Attn: FWS-R2-ES-2020-0007 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, MS: PRB/PERMA (JAO/1N), 5275 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, VA 22041–3803. Comments must be submitted by 11:59 p.m. ET on June 15, 2020.

For more on the Mexican Wolf Recovery Program, visit the Mexican wolf website: https://www.fws.gov/southwest/es/mexicanwolf/.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.