Conserving the Nature of America
Press Release
Endangered Species Day: Congratulations to the 2018 Recovery Champions

May 17, 2019

Contact(s):

Pam Bierce, pamela_bierce@fws.gov, 916.414.6542



Sacramento, Calif. As people around the country celebrate Endangered Species Day, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is recognizing today the contributions and achievements of our Recovery Champions. Every year, the Service recognizes and honors staff and partners whose work is advancing the recovery of endangered and threatened species of plants and animals in the United States.

“Recovery Champions are helping listed species get to the point at which they are secure in the wild and no longer need Endangered Species Act protection,” said Paul Souza, Director of the Service’s Pacific Southwest Region. “These groups are changing the world, doing amazing work to bring dozens of species back from the brink of extinction and improving habitat that benefits many other species and local communities.”

Congratulations to the Pacific Southwest Region’s 2018 Recovery Champions!

Klamath Falls Fish and Wildlife Office

Josh Rasmussen, Evan Childress, Dan Blake, Laurie Sada, Julie Day, Joel Ophoff, Kirk Groves, Mike Senn, Ron Barnes (Gone Fishing, LLC), Tracey Liskey (Gone Fishing, LLC)

Klamath Falls Fish and Wildlife Office staff – with support from Gone Fishing, LLC. – have made significant contributions to the recovery of the endangered shortnose and Lost River suckers. Staff implemented an adaptive recovery program and have worked to identify and address threats to sucker survival such as water quality, parasitism and predation. The team established a captive rearing program to help juvenile fish survive beyond their first two years, eventually maturing into a spawning adult population. The program resulted in 21,000 juvenile sucker larvae being collected, with 2,500 two-year old juveniles released back into Klamath Lake last year. Four additional rearing ponds constructed in 2018 are expected to be in production this summer. The expansions will likely double the rearing capacity from 8,000 to 16,000 fish in 2019.

Santa Barbara Zoo

Rich Block, Aaron Marshall, Estelle Sandhaus, Julie Barnes, Rachel Ritchason, Carol Hunsperger, Nadya Seal Faith, David Meyer, Erin Arnold

The Santa Barbara Zoo has been instrumental in the recovery of endangered, threatened and at-risk species along California's central coast. More than 40 years of partnership has lifted the endangered California condor back from the brink of extinction. Zoo staff monitored nests, provided veterinary support, installed and operated nest camera technology, and engaged the public to build support for the species' recovery. Through a successful captive breeding and reintroduction program, the zoo has also helped island fox populations on San Miguel, Santa Rosa, and Santa Cruz Islands rebound to self-sustaining levels, and ultimately these three subspecies were removed from the endangered species list in 2016—marking the fastest recovery of any mammal under the Endangered Species Act. Additionally, zoo staff have recently taken the lead in the rearing, rehabilitation, color banding, and releasing of abandoned and rescued western snowy plover eggs and chicks, contributing to the recovery of this tiny, yet resilient shorebird.

For photos and information about the 2018 Recovery Champions, please visit:

https://www.fws.gov/endangered/what-we-do/recovery-champions/index.html

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service works with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. For more information about our work and the people who make it happen, visit https://www.fws.gov/cno/ or connect with us via Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr.

 

                                                                                                        -FWS

 


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.