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Resiliency and recovery: Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges overcomes Irma to offer Outdoor Fest

February 15, 2018 | 3 minute readU.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex and their Friends group Florida Keys Wildlife Society invites everyone to celebrate this great comeback on Saturday, March 10th through Saturday, March 17th, with the third annual Outdoor Fest, featuring a week of family-friendly, mostly free outdoor adventures and hands-on activities. Read the full story...

A beautiful sunset on the water with three kayaks one with a dog on board.

Third annual Outdoor Fest to showcase Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges

February 15, 2018 | 4 minute readGet an up-close take on the great outdoors with the Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuge system celebration Saturday, March 10th through Saturday, March 17th, with the third annual Outdoor Fest. Read the full story...

Participants enjoy FAVOR’s monthly Full Moon Kayak adventure, a trip that goes north into Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Mary Lou Dickson.

A hand holding a brownish red crayfish near a cameras lens with a stream in the background.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes listing Panama City crayfish as federally threatened

January 3, 2018 | 4 minute readPanama City, Florida – Based on the best available science, the Service has found that the Panama City crayfish – a two-inch-long crustacean found only in the open pine flatwoods and wet prairie marshes of Bay County, Florida – meets the definition of “threatened” under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and is proposing it for listing. The Service is opening a 60-day public comment period on the proposal. Under the ESA, a threatened species is one that is likely to become extinct within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. Read the full story...

Panama City crayfish. Photo by FWC.

A light purple salamander with dark spots and tufts above its front legs.

Alabama “mudpuppy” to receive federal protection

January 2, 2018 | 3 minute readThe Black Warrior waterdog, a large aquatic salamander found only in the Black Warrior River Basin in Alabama, is now a federally protected species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) listed the salamander as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), meaning it is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A rigorous review of the best available science has found low and declining population numbers due to loss and fragmentation of its habitat and poor water quality in the Black Warrior River Basin. Read the full story...

Black Warrior waterdog. Photo by Joseph Jenkins, Alabama Natural Heritage Program.

Tiny South Georgia snail presumed extinct, will not receive federal protection

December 28, 2017 | 1 minute readThe beaverpond marstonia, a tiny snail the size of a pencil eraser, was discovered in 1977 in a creek in South Georgia. It’s been 17 years since it was last seen. Based on the best available information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing today that the beaverpond marstonia is presumed to be extinct. As a result, the agency will not list the species as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Read the full story...

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