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  • A small brown and yellow speckled fish in a biologists hand.
    Information icon Snail darter. USFWS

    Service Proposes Removing Storied Snail Darter from Endangered Species Act Due to Recovery

    August 31, 2021 | 5 minute read

    There was a time when the snail darter was the biggest little fish in the United States. In the 1970s, the tiny, endangered Tennessee fish was in the news regularly, the subject of a Supreme Court ruling, an act of Congress, and a giant proposed dam that threatened it with extinction. Inspired by its Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections, over the last 40 years conservation partners went to work protecting and restoring snail darters, conducting surveys that located additional populations, and reintroducing the fish to rivers it once called home.  Read the full story...

  • A white flowering plant.
    Information icon Cumberland sand-wort by D. Pineros.

    Service Delists Cumberland Sandwort from Endangered Species Act Due to Recovery

    August 17, 2021 | 2 minute read

    After more than three decades of conservation partnerships inspired by the Endangered Species Act and a thorough review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is delisting the Cumberland sandwort due to recovery. “Partnerships are the key to the success of the Endangered Species Act,” said Leopoldo Miranda-Castro, Service Regional Director. “Playing critical roles in the recovery of this delicate flower were the National Park Service, U.  Read the full story...

  • A green, leafy fern branch being held held by a biologist.
    Information icon Adiantum vivesii by Jennifer Possley at Fairchild Botanical Garden.

    El Servicio propone remover un helecho puertorriqueño de la lista de plantas amenazadas y en peligro de extinción

    July 30, 2021 | 3 minute read

    Hoy, el Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre propone remover a Adiantum vivesii de la Ley de Especies en Peligro de Extinción (ESA, por sus siglas en inglés). Después de una revisión de la mejor data científica y comercial disponible, incluyendo la revisión de estatus de la especie de 5 años, el Servicio ha determinado que Adiantum vivesii es un híbrido estéril de dos especies de helechos comunes. Por consiguiente, no cumple con la definición legal de una especie bajo la ESA.  Read the full story...

  • A green, leafy fern branch being held held by a biologist.
    Information icon Adiantum vivesii by Jennifer Possley at Fairchild Botanical Garden.

    Service Proposes Removal of Puerto Rican Fern from List of Threatened and Endangered Plants

    July 30, 2021 | 2 minute read

    Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to remove the Adiantum vivesii from the Endangered Species Act (ESA). After a review of the best available scientific and commercial data, including the 5-year status review, the Service has found that Adiantum vivesii is a sterile hybrid of two common fern species. As such, it does not meet the statutory definition of a species under the ESA. “The Service’s work is grounded in thorough, objective science with a goal of conserving natural resources for future generations.  Read the full story...

  • A tiny white flower bloom amongst green large leaves.
    Information icon Palo de rosa in bloom; Photo credit – Omar Monsegur, USFWS.

    El Servicio Federal de Pesca y Vida Silvestre propone reclasificar a palo de rosa de especie en peligro de extinción a amenazada: Preguntas Frecuentes

    July 19, 2021 | 5 minute read

    Gracias a los exitosos esfuerzos de colaboradores locales el árbol de palo de rosa está en camino hacia la recuperación. Este árbol perenne, cuyo nombre en español describe su madera de color rosa y el cual ocurre en Puerto Rico y República Dominicana, ha mostrado mejoras sustanciales desde que fue incluido como una especie en peligro de extinción bajo la Ley Federal de Especies en Peligro (ESA, por sus siglas en inglés) en 1990.  Read the full story...

  • A small shorebird walking through a tide pool on the beach, with other shorebirds.
    Information icon Tagged red knot. Mispillion Harbor, Delaware. Credit: Gregory Breese,USFWS

    Agency Proposes Critical Habitat for Threatened Rufa Red Knot Shorebird

    July 14, 2021 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today a proposed rule to designate 649,066 acres of critical habitat across 13 states for the rufa red knot, a robin-sized shorebird that relies on U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts to fuel its remarkable migrations from the Canadian Arctic to the southern tip of South America. If finalized, the designation would not require federal agencies to expand their current approach in reviewing federal actions such as those involving recreation, development or other activities in rufa red knot habitat.  Read the full story...

  • A parrot mid-flight with vibrant green feathers, with blue feathering on the tip of the wings. And red feathers above the beak
    Information icon Puerto Rican Parrot in flight. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, Biologist, USFWS

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Conducts Five-year Status Reviews of 37 Southeastern Species

    July 13, 2021 | 3 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 37 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are primarily found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico, but are also known to occur in Delaware, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Texas, and Virginia. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before September 13, 2021.  Read the full story...

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