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  • A man in a green shirt kneels down into tall grass to release a long black snake.
    Information icon David Printiss of TNC releases an eastern indigo snake into a gopher tortoise burrow during a 2018 release. Photo by Tim Donovan, FWC.

    Good news for America’s longest snake! 15 eastern indigo snakes just released in year three of the North Florida recovery effort

    June 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Fifteen eastern indigo snakes, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, have just been released in northern Florida as part of a continuing collaborative plan to return the important, native, non-venomous apex predator to the region. This effort marks the third year in a row that snakes raised specifically for recovery of the species have been released at The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol.  Read the full story...

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings
    Information icon Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan available for endangered Cumberland darter

    June 5, 2019 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the recovery plan for the Cumberland darter, a fish listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The darter is found in the upper Cumberland River drainage, above Cumberland Falls, in southeastern Kentucky and north central Tennessee. Its recovery plan describes actions necessary for its recovery, establishes criteria for delisting it, and estimates the time and cost for implementing necessary recovery actions.  Read the full story...

  • A tiny greenish brown fish in front of a white ruler.
    Information icon Spring pygmy sunfish. Photo by Matt Laschet, USFWS.

    Service finalizes critical habitat for spring pygmy sunfish

    May 29, 2019 | 3 minute read

    After the discovery of a new population of spring pygmy sunfish and review of scientific information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has finalized critical habitat for the fish in three areas in Alabama: two in Limestone County, and one in Madison County. Two of these units are currently occupied by the sunfish, while the third unit was historically occupied, but is currently not inhabited by the species. The Service determined the unoccupied unit contains suitable habitat for the species.  Read the full story...

  • An employee in uniform drains a large truck basin full of water and fish into a river.
    Information icon Edenton National Fish Hatchery manager Stephen Jackson watches lake sturgeon flow into the French Broad River. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes allowing fishing from Edenton National Fish Hatchery boardwalk and portion of shoreline

    May 28, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Edenton, North Carolina — Anglers wanting to try their luck at a couple of spots on Pembroke Creek may soon get the chance. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing allowing recreational fishing for all legal species in the creek from the boardwalk on the hatchery as well as the shoreline adjacent to the hatchery’s water intake. The areas would be open for anglers when the hatchery is open. Its daily hours are 7 a.  Read the full story...

  • Sign at the entrance of the hatchery.
    Information icon Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery. Photo by Robert Pos, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes allowing fishing in the Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery boardwalk and portion of shoreline

    May 28, 2019 | 1 minute read

    Orangeburg, South Carolina — County Hatchery Pond may soon be open to anglers, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has announced. The pond would be open for all legal species. It’s located in the Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery substation on Cannon Bridge Road in Cordova, about six miles southwest of Orangeburg. The area would be open for anglers from dawn until dusk. All state of South Carolina fishing regulations will apply.  Read the full story...

  • A small catfish with brown and white markings and long barbells extending from its mouth.
    Information icon Carolina madtom. Photo by Scott Smith and Fritz Rohde.

    Carolina madtom and Neuse River waterdog proposed for Endangered Species Act protection

    May 21, 2019 | 5 minute read

    The venom in the stinging spines of the Carolina madtom’s fins is so potent that it earned the freshwater catfish the scientific name, Noturus furiosus. The Neuse River waterdog salamander, with its black spots and red external gills, looks like something out of a science fiction movie. Both species are part of North Carolina’s rich biological heritage, and due to ongoing threats are now only found in limited and shrinking areas of the state.  Read the full story...

  • Hundreds of people huddle around the banks of a shallow creek with fishing rods.
    Information icon Hatchery Creek during the Catch a Rainbow Fishing Derby. Photo by Alex Hoover, USFWS.

    33rd Annual Catch a Rainbow Kids Fishing Derby at Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery

    May 16, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Jamestown, KY – What began as a small event in 1986 has now blossomed into one of the largest events of its kind in the country. This year’s 33rd Annual Catch A Rainbow Kids Fishing Derby is scheduled for Saturday, June 1, 2019, at Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery. Designed as a way to get kids outdoors and connected to fishing, this event provides an opportunity for families to have fun with a rod and reel.  Read the full story...

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