Visit Us

Visitors will discover scenic landscapes and opportunities to view wildlife, all within a short drive of the Portland-Vancouver metro area. A close-by escape from the city, the Refuge provides a home for local animals and plants that live here year-round, as well as those that migrate here for a season. With every visit, there is the opportunity to experience something new or expand your learning of what may be familiar to you. 

If you are local to the Camas/Washougal area and need transportation to the refuge, visit here to learn how to use C-Tran's $1 on-demand rideshare service, The Current.

Visitor Parking:

The main Refuge entrance has a parking lot with one ADA van accessible spot/unloading area and one additional ADA accessible parking spot on the east side of the lot near the trailhead kiosk. There is one Bus/RV spot. If planning a visit with a bus, please contact Refuge Staff to ensure the spot is not already in use during your visit, by calling the Refuge Office at 360-835-8767.

Welcome Area in Parking Lot:

  • Information: The Mt. View Trailhead provides information about the site including a Welcome Kiosk with a complete trail map, handouts on the site and trails, youth-focused guides, a bulletin board with upcoming events and a whiteboard to read about recent sightings and post your own on the backside and a boot brush to clean shoes before/after visiting!
  • Surface: Crushed gravel
  • Average path width: 5 feet 
  • Restrooms: Two all gender ADA pit toilets (non-flushing) with grab bars. No running water, changing tables or trash bins provided. Toilets are located about 300 feet from the parking lot, along a crushed gravel trail
  • Benches: 2 stone benches are located between the parking lot and the restroom and 2 more are located just south beyond the restroom

Activities

At your local refuges, we celebrate that everyone experiences nature and the benefits of being outdoors in different ways. Staff strive to create outdoor experiences for those coming from many backgrounds, interests, and comfort levels. The following are wildlife-dependent activities that will help you explore the outdoors and experience your own personal connection to the natural world.

Trails

The Mountain View Trail is named for the view of Mt Hood that can be seen on a clear day. It allows you to look out east over the Refuge from the trail that sits high on top of this west levee. The trail also serves as a service road, used only occasionally for maintenance purposes.  

The main access to this trail is from the parking lot. Head up the trail just past the restrooms to the top of the levee. The trail continues straight ahead to a viewpoint where you’ll find two stone benches and breathtaking views of the floodplain below. Beyond the viewpoint the trail will continue for about a mile, before intersecting the Refuge River Trail. 
 

Trail name: Mt. View Trail

  • Open season: Year-round
  • Access: from the main entrance parking lot, located of SR-14/45th street
  • Uses: Pedestrian only. (No dogs, horses or bicycles) Great for wildlife observation and photography
  • Length: 1 mile 
  • Difficulty: Wide, flat trail with incline from parking lot to top of the trail and slight decline where meets Refuge River Trail
  • Route type: Point to point as part of a larger trail network
  • Surface: Compact gravel 
  • Average width: 12 feet 
  • Max slope: 5% 
  • Benches: 2 stone benches at viewpoint, 2 solid wooden benches with a back rest, a handrail, and open side along trail
     

Things to consider:  

  • Because this trail is up you are more exposed to the weather. There are no shaded areas or wind protection on this trail. 
  • There are no physical markers to designate the sides of the trail
  • There are no distance markers or other signage along the trail 
  • The gate in the parking lot closes automatically. Remember to check the closing time and give yourself plenty of time to return to your car. Visitors locked in the parking lot will need to call the police non-emergency line at 311.  
     

The Refuge River Trail is the only multi-use trail allowing the unique opportunity to experience the Refuge with a bicycle, horse, or leashed dog.  The trail can be accessed from the western entrance of the Refuge near Index Street (see William Clark Park), or by the pedestrian only Mt. View Trail. From Index Street it meets up with the Mt. View Trail after about a mile and continues east for 2.5 more. This trail parallels the Columbia River and then meanders further into the Refuge. Two large foot bridges and a viewpoint overlooking the river allows you different ways to connect and view the Refuge.   





 

Trail name: Refuge River Trail

  • Open season: Year-round
  • Access: from the western entrance of the Refuge near Index Street (see William Clark Park), or by the pedestrian only Mt. View Trail
  • Uses: Pedestrians, bicycles, jogging, horseback riding, and leashed dogs. Great for scenic views and exercise
  • Length: 3 miles 
  • Difficulty: Wide, flat trail with minimal slope changes, with two bridge crossings
  • Route Type: Point to point as part of a larger trail network.  
  • Surface: Compact gravel, wooden slated bridges
  • Average width: 10 feet 
  • Max slope: 5% 
  • Benches: one wooden bench with backrest, handrail and open seating west of the trail intersection with the Mt. View Trail, at viewpoint, and first bridge
     

Things to consider:  

  • This trail has heavy use on sunny days, especially in the summer. Visitors share this trail with horses, cyclists, and leashed dogs. 
  • There are no distance markers or other signage along the trail 

Along the Wildlife Art Trail you will not find signs to read, but art to discover as you explore. Look for quotes hidden among the stone benches, unique sculptures, and wildlife cut outs to lock your bike to.  We hope this art will inspire you to wonder about the nature it represents.  

The trail is accessed from theRefuge River Trail and wraps around Redtail lake over two bridges. A small out and back trail heads west off the second bridge to a short dead end looking out over a wetland. The trail connects with the Refuge River trail again at the first of the two bridges.  




 

Trail name: Wildlife Art Trail

  • Open season: A section is closed seasonally between artwork "doors" Oct 1 - April 30, with year-round access from Refuge River Trail to bridge 2 (Cottonwood bridge)
  • Access: from Refuge River Trail where intersects near Redtail Lake (year-round) and from bridge 2 (Dragonfly bridge) on the Refuge River trail seasonally, May 1 - Sept 30
  • Uses: Pedestrian only. (No dogs, horses or bicycles) Great for wildlife observation and photography
  • Length: 1 mile 
  • Difficulty: Flat trail, narrow in some places with two bridge crossings
  • Route Type: Point to point as part of a larger trail network
  • Surface: Compact gravel 
  • Average width: 6 feet 
  • Max slope: 5% 
  • Benches: At Redtail lake and between the two bridges
     

Things to consider: 

  • Dogs, horses and bicycles are not compatible with the wildlife needs on this part of the refuge. Please plan accordingly if you plan to use this part of the trail network. Bicycle racks are available 
  • There are no distance markers or other signage along the trail

Related Documents

Steigerwald Lake NWR reopens in May with a new trail system! Due to the recent reconstruction the trail map data on this site is outdated. Please refer to this map for the latest trail information. 

Steigerwald Lake NWR Map May 1

Other Facilities in the Complex

The Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge Complex is comprised of four refuges along the lower Columbia River.

Rules and Policies

The refuge welcomes visitors to experience nature in ways that depend upon wildlife, such as wildlife observation, photography and environmental education. Other activities that are not wildlife-dependent such as biking, jogging and horseback riding are uniquely offered at this refuge along the Refuge River Trail. The following rules and policies are intended to keep both wildlife and visitors safe and provide an enjoyable experience for all. 

Locations

Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge - Mt. View Trailhead
34301 SE Lewis and Clark HwyWashougal,WA98671
Driving Directions
  • From Vancouver, WA  travel east on WA SR 14 for about 18 miles
  • A brown sign indicates the Refuge is ahead 1/4 mile 
  • Just past Washougal River Road will be 45th Street on your left and the Refuge on your right. 

If you are local to the Camas/Washougal area and need transportation to the refuge, visit here to learn how to use C-Tran's $1 on-demand rideshare service, The Current.

Hours
Automatic Gate Times
Daily
7:00 am to 6:00 pm, Sunrise - Sunset
County Park Entrance to Refuge - River Trailhead

This is the secondary entrance to Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge and the main trailhead for the Refuge River Trail (the only trail on the Refuge that allows dogs on leash, bikes, horses and and jogging.)

Parking and restrooms near this entrance are not managed by the Refuge. Please follow all County Park regulations when entering parking here. 

Hours
Day Use Only
Daily
7:00 am to 6:00 pm, Sunrise - Sunset