This refuge is currently open only to public hunting

This refuge is new to the National Wildlife Refuge System and requires a full review prior to opening to additional public uses. 

John W. and Louise Seier National Wildlife Refuge, found in north-central Nebraska, 25 miles south of Bassett, Nebraska, is a sanctuary among the Sandhills. The Sandhills region is the largest remaining tract of mixed and tall grass prairie in North America. The Refuge is new to the National Wildlife Refuge System and is currently open only to public hunting.

Visit Us

Hunting is currently the only public use at the Refuge. Please click here to view the hunting brochure. 

Location and Contact Information

      About Us

      The John W. and Louise Seier National Wildlife Refuge is administered through the Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge Complex at Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge. 

      The Refuge is made up of grassland and wetland habitats. Two creeks run through the Refuge; Bloody Creek and Skull Creek. Bloody Creek, a smaller stream that runs only during high precipitation, cuts across the Refuge for 1.25 miles. Skull Creek, a larger stream that runs throughout the year, flows across one-half mile of the western portion of the Refuge, and empties into the Calamus River. A variety of wildlife, small and large game species, such as white-tailed deer, prairie grouse and wild turkeys, as well as many other species of birds call the Refuge home. 

      What We Do

      Once an environmental assessment is completed Refuge staff will utilize a variety of management techniques to maintain, restore and enhance plant and wildlife habitats. Refuge staff carefully considers all management techniques and employ them in the most efficient and sound manner possible. Prescribed burning, mowing, use of biological control (insects) for invasive plants, and native plant seeding are some of the techniques used to help restore native plant communities. Grazing by cattle is used on the Refuge to help maintain grassland health. Cattle are used as a substitute for bison and elk grazing that would have historically occurred on Refuge lands.

      Ground and aerial wildlife and vegetation surveys are conducted on the Refuge throughout the year to inventory populations and document habitat use. Units are evaluated by how well they meet the habitat and wildlife use objectives set for the Refuge.

      Our Species

      The Refuge is home to a variety of wildlife, small and big game species such as white-tailed deer, prairie grouse, wild turkeys, and many other species of birds.