Coronavirus (COVID-19) Notice
Although most refuge lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you do the following:

  • Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information. Operations vary based on local public health conditions.
  • Face masks are required in all federal buildings and on all federal lands.
  • Maintain a safe distance between yourself and other groups.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick


What You Need To Know

Working With Water

Backhoe Illustration

Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge is adding to its wetland acreage with the conversion of a weed infested upland to approximately 30 acres of prime wetland habitat! The restoration will not only increase the amount of feeding and loafing habitat available for migratory and wintering water birds, but will also improve the function of the adjacent wetlands by providing greater connectivity.

Resource Management

Wading Bird Gallery

Sandhill Crane Illustration

Toppenish is all about water birds—well, mostly about. There's no argument, though, that the big wading birds are spectacular. Check out the Wading Bird Photo Gallery.

Wading Birds

Help Save Our Bats

Save Our Bats Logo

White-nose Syndrome is a horrible disease threatening our bats—bats critical to our environment and food supply. If you like tequila, mangoes, guavas, or any of over 300 other fruits, take the time to learn what you can do to help the Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service—and yourself!

White-nose Syndrome
Basic Stuff

Watching Wildlife

Ducks

Want to see more animals on your trip to Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge? Here are some tips from the "experts."

Watching Wildlife

About the Complex

Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge is managed as part of the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Read more about the complex
About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

NWRS Logo

The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America's fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS