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On the Sweetwater Marsh Unit

Visit the Living Coast Discovery Center

Bat ray exhibit at the Chula Vista Nature Center

The Living Coast Discovery Center is a 501(c)3 Non-Profit organization, and runs in partnership with the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge Complex. Visitors can enjoy environmental education programs and view live animals.

Learn more about the Nature Center

About the Complex

San Diego National Wildlife Refuge Complex

Complex Graphic

The San Diego NWR Complex manages diverse wildlife and their habitats on four Refuges: Tijuana Slough NWR, San Diego Bay NWR, San Diego NWR, and Seal Beach NWR.

San Diego Bay is managed as part of the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge Complex.

Learn more about the complex 

About the NWRS

National Wildlife Refuge System

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The National Wildlife Refuge System, within the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, manages a national network of lands and waters set aside to conserve America’s fish, wildlife, and plants.

Learn more about the NWRS  

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WHATS NEW

  • Otay Restoration Project Draft EIS Available for Public Comment

    Otay R Estuary aerial thumbnailOctober 21, 2016

    The draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) for the Otay River Estuary Restoration Project (ORERP) is ready for your input! This 125-acre project is partial mitigation for the Carlsbad Desalination Plant. The DEIS public comment period has been extended until December 30.

    Otay River Estuary Restoration Project
  • Mayor's Award Given for D Street Restoration Project

    mayors award thumbnailOctober 20, 2016

    San Diego Gas & Electric and the US Fish & Wildlife Service received the Mayor's Neighborhood Revitalization Award for the D Street Fill Wetlands Restoration Project completed earlier in 2016. The Mayor of Chula Vista, Mary Casillas Salas, presented the plaques to SDG&E and the San Diego Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Mayor Salas spoke fondly about her childhood and exploring the marshlands of south San Diego Bay. The event was wonderful and Channel 10 reporter Joe Little was the emcee. "Many thanks to all that assisted in the completion of this project, especially Vicki Touchstone and Brian Collins for their hard work and cooperation in the planning and design for this project” – Andy Yuen, Project Leader.

    Photo of Award Plaque
  • Historic Release of Endangered Light-footed Ridgway's Rails

    Amelia the LFRR by Rinus BaakSeptember 27, 2016

    For the past 6 decades, Light-footed Ridgway's rails (previously called clapper rails) haven't been able to call the southwestern area of San Diego Bay home. Now, thanks to a restoration project completed in 2011, the salt marsh has recovered enough to support the rails again. Six of them were released onto the refuge this week, with five fitted with satellite telemetry so scientists can monitor their movements. Check out our Open Spaces blog for the story, and live video.

    Open Spaces: Endangered Rails Released in San Diego
Page Photo Credits — Elegant tern chicks on June 28, 2015 by Robert Patton
Last Updated: Nov 23, 2016
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