Greenback cutthroat trout swimming in a mountain stream.

Greenback Cutthroat Trout Research and Recovery

Colorado Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office is involved with recovery efforts of federally endangered greenback cutthroat trout. We are a part of the Greenback Cutthroat Recovery Team and participate as subject matter experts in document reviews. Our staff assists Colorado Parks and Wildlife with numerous greenback cutthroat trout reclamation projects to remove non-native fish species from watersheds and allow reintroduction of greenbacks in their native range. We partner with the Leadville National Fish Hatchery to develop greenback cutthroat trout brood stocks.

Cutthroat trout populations in Rocky Mountain National Park are monitored by Colorado Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office fish biologist, Chris Kennedy. Although they are not considered genetically pure greenback cutthroat trout based on the most current science, the park still manages them as greenbacks. Chris is a core team member of the Greenback Cutthroat Trout Species Status Assessment with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Ecological Services and he is also involved with several research projects through Colorado State University to increase genetic diversity and develop brood stocks of greenbacks.

Species

Programs

The Fish and Aquatic Conservation program leads aquatic conservation efforts for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. We are committed to tackling the nation’s highest priority aquatic conservation and recreational challenges to conserve, restore, and enhance fisheries for future generations.
The Ecological Services Program works to restore and protect healthy populations of fish, wildlife, and plants and the environments upon which they depend. Using the best available science, we work with federal, state, Tribal, local, and non-profit stakeholders, as well as private land owners, to...

Facilities

Leadville National Fish Hatchery, established in 1889, is the second oldest federally operated fish hatchery in operation today.