Georgia Department of Natural Resources

Related Stories

Freshwater mussel survey in southeast Georgia
Representatives from diverse organizations gathered in Georgia to learn about freshwater mussel systematics, identification, and ecology.
Close up of sedge seedheads
Biologists with a passion for plant conservation recently collaborated with Georgia Public Broadcast to produce a 26-minute video for Georgia Outdoors highlighting some of the work to protect and conserve at-risk plants.
A stream through the mountains.
ESA 50th Anniversary: More Important than Ever The Endangered Species Act of 1973 is the nation’s most important, and successful, tool to protect animals and plants at risk of extinction. The act currently covers 1,683 U.S. species and 646 foreign species. It serves as the emergency room for fish...
Close up of biologist holding small brook trout.
Higher temperatures, killer droughts, biblical rainstorms, and other climatic events pose an existential danger to the rainbow, brown, and brook trout of the southern Appalachians.
Freshwater mussel with a prominant spine at the top of its shell sits on a red net
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of the draft recovery plan for the Altamaha spinymussel (Elliptio spinosa), a mussel found in the Ocmulgee, Altamaha and Ohoopee Rivers in Georgia. The mussel was federally listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in...
Four people in orange hunting vests, two with firearms in their hands, stand in front of a truck in the woods smiling.
I have always been the outdoorsy type. Whether it be hiking, mountain biking, kayaking or surfing, if it gets me closer to nature, I have probably tried it or plan to. I just can’t get enough of the outdoors. Despite that, there is one outdoor activity I could never have imagined pursuing — hunting.
A green leafy shrub with purplish-black berries.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the Georgia bully, a flowering shrub found in Georgia, Florida and Alabama, is not at risk of extinction and does not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

Partner Category

Our hands-on stewardship and public engagement is often done in conjunction with state and provincial agencies.

Other Partners

Here are just a few of our National Partners. You can view the full list of FWS partners, along with the regions and areas of focus our work together entails.

Partnership Services

Through our partnerships we are able to expand our capabilities through the inclusion of services in areas such as:

  • Grant opportunities
  • Sponsorship of grants
  • Cooperative Agreements

To find out more about how our partner provides services view our partner services below.