The Appalachian Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office works in partnership with others to restore fish and wildlife populations and their habitats throughout the central Appalachians.  

About Us

The Appalachian Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office is part of a network of field stations located throughout the nation that works to conserve fish and aquatic resource, protect imperiled species and their habitats, and monitor and control invasive species invasive species
An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

Learn more about invasive species
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What We Do

Our biologists help landowners and other partners assess, plan, and conduct habitat restoration including: 

  • Restoring wetlands, riparian riparian
    Definition of riparian habitat or riparian areas.

    Learn more about riparian
    , in-stream and upland / forested habitats
  • Removing fish passage barriers such as dams and culverts
  • Replacing road-stream crossings and culverts resilient to high water flows and provide better fish passage at all times of the year. 
  • Controlling invasive species invasive species
    An invasive species is any plant or animal that has spread or been introduced into a new area where they are, or could, cause harm to the environment, economy, or human, animal, or plant health. Their unwelcome presence can destroy ecosystems and cost millions of dollars.

    Learn more about invasive species
  • Planting native trees and shrubs
  • Fencing livestock out of stream and riparian areas

 

Services

The National Fish Habitat Partnership is a national investment strategy designed to maximize the impact of conservation dollars on the ground. Funds are leveraged through regional partnerships to address the nation’s biggest fish habitat challenges and projects are identified and completed...

The National Fish Passage Program provides financial and technical assistance for projects that improve the ability of fish or other aquatic species to migrate by reconnecting habitat that has been fragmented by a barrier such as a dam or culvert. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists...

Projects and Research

West Virginia’s Potomac Headwaters Home Rivers Initiative

Partners: Trout Unlimited, USDA Farm Service Agency, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, and West Virginia Conservation Agency
Location: Upper North Fork South Branch Potomac River, West Virginia
The need: High elevations and Project...

Removing three dams on the West Fork River back in 2016 has improved boating access and fish passage along the river. But perhaps more importantly to local residents, the river's water quality and drinking water is improved, and it's safe to go boating and swimming now that the dams have been removed. Indeed, the river is becoming a tourist destination for anglers and boaters - improving...

Location and Contact Information