Conserving the Nature of America
Press Release
Service proposes removing San Benito evening primrose from endangered species list

May 29, 2020

Contact(s):

Ashley McConnell ashley_mcconnell@fws.gov, (805) 677-3301


San Benito evening primrose, small yellow flower with green foliage

San Benito evening primrose Credit: Ryan O’Dell/BLM

A small annual plant with bright yellow flowers once thought to be in danger of extinction is being found more commonly in the coast range in California’s San Benito, Monterey, and Fresno counties, prompting the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to propose removing it from the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Wildlife and Plants.

“Whenever we can propose the delisting of a species due to ESA-inspired partnerships and improved science is a good day,” said Service director Aurelia Skipwith. “Thanks to the efforts of the Bureau of Land Management over the course of three decades, our scientific understanding of the San Benito evening primrose has improved and habitat for the plant has been restored and protected.”  

The Service listed the San Benito evening primrose as threatened under the ESA in 1985 due to ongoing threats of motorized recreation activities and commercial mining operations. At the time of listing, the San Benito evening primrose was documented in only nine locations in a small area of San Benito County. Annual surveys for the species have since found more than 100 areas across multiple watersheds in portions of San Benito, Monterey, and Fresno counties. The primary threats to the species at the time of listing no longer threaten the plant's survival in the wild.

The Service is committed to using the best available scientific information to inform our decisions regarding species’ classification on the Federal List of Threatened and Endangered Wildlife and Plants.

The proposal to delist the San Benito evening primrose will publish in the Federal Register on June 1, 2020, opening a 60-day public comment period. The Service will consider comments from all interested parties received by July 31, 2020. Information on how to submit comments is available at www.regulations.gov by searching under docket number FWS–R8–ES–2019–0065.

Working with others is essential to protecting ecosystems that benefit society as a whole. The Service regularly engages conservation partners, the public, landowners, government agencies, and other stakeholders in our ongoing effort to identify innovative strategies for conserving and recovering protected wildlife, plants, and their habitats. 

 

The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/ventura. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel, and download photos from our Flickr page.

                                                                                                                     -FWS-

Photos of San Benito evening primrose


The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with others to conserve, protect, and enhance fish, wildlife, plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people. We are both a leader and trusted partner in fish and wildlife conservation, known for our scientific excellence, stewardship of lands and natural resources, dedicated professionals, and commitment to public service. For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit www.fws.gov.

For more information on our work and the people who make it happen, visit http://www.fws.gov/. Connect with our Facebook page, follow our tweets, watch our YouTube Channel and download photos from our Flickr page.