Conserving the Nature of America
Press Release
Service Announces Recovery Plan Revisions for 25 Species, To Assist in Measuring Progress and Addressing Threats
Additions part of comprehensive effort to ensure all Endangered Species Act recovery plans contain quantifiable recovery goals

August 5, 2019

Contact(s):

Brian Hires, brian_hires@fws.gov, 703-358-2191



As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 21 recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 25 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals. The effort calls for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery by September 2019.

Recovery plans are non-regulatory guidance documents that identify, organize and prioritize recovery actions, set measurable recovery objectives, and include time and cost estimates. In total, the Service will revise up to 182 recovery plans covering some 305 species listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).

The Service’s success in preventing extinctions and recovering species is due to ESA-inspired partnerships with diverse stakeholders, such as state, federal, and tribal wildlife agencies, industry, conservation groups and citizens. Each species for which recovery criteria are being revised in this effort has undergone or is currently undergoing a status review that considers the best scientific and commercial data that have become available since the species’ listing or most recent status review. This information includes: (1) the biology of the species, (2) habitat conditions, (3) conservation measures that have benefitted the species, (4) threat status and trends in relation to the five listing factors, and (5) other information, data, or corrections.

As such, these revisions reflect scientific and informational updates, which have been gained from years of collaborative work with our partners. Revisions benefit endangered and threatened species, our partners, and the public by sharing the best available information about what is really needed to achieve recovery.

Under guidance established in 2010, partial revisions, such as amendments, allow the Service to efficiently and effectively update recovery plans with the latest science and information when a recovery plan may not warrant the time or resources required to undertake a full revision of the plan. This batch includes both amendments and full recovery plan revisions, as noted in the tables below.

The document appears today in the Federal Register Reading Room here: https://www.federalregister.gov/public-inspection. There will be a 30-day comment period on the proposed revisions, ending on September 4, 2019.

We are requesting submission of any information that enhances understanding of the: (1) species’ biology and threats, and the (2) recovery needs and related implementation issues or concerns. We seek to ensure that we have assembled, considered and incorporated the best available scientific and commercial information into the draft recovery plan revisions for these 25 species.

The plan revisions cover the following species:

Table 1. List of Animals in Batch


Common Name

Current Range

Recovery Plan Name

Internet Availability of Proposed Recovery Plan Revision

Sonoran tiger salamander

AZ

Sonoran Tiger Salamander Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_Sonoran%20tiger%20salamander_03152019.pdf

Masked bobwhite

AZ

Masked Bobwhite Recovery Plan, Second Revision1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_masked%20bobwhite_03152019.pdf

Fountain darter

TX

San Marcos and Comal Springs and Associated Aquatic Ecosystems (Revised) Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_San%20Marcos%20and%20Comal%20Springs_1.pdf

Texas blind salamander

TX

Little Colorado spinedace

AZ

Little Colorado River Spinedace Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_Little%20Colorado%20spinedace_03202019.pdf

Spikedace

AZ, NM

Spikedace Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_spikedace_03152019.pdf

Loach minnow

AZ, NM

Loach Minnow Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_loach%20minnow_03152019.pdf

Virginia big-eared bat

KY, NC, TN, VA, WV

A Recovery Plan for the Ozark Big-Eared Bat and the Virginia Big-Eared Bat1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/20190313_Draft%20VBEB%20Recovery%20Plan%20Amendment.pdf

Pawnee montane skipper

CO

Pawnee Montane Skipper Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Pawnee%20montane%20skipper_Draft%20Amendment%201.pdf

El Segundo blue butterfly

CA

El Segundo Blue Butterfly Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20RP%20Amendment%20ESB_1.pdf

Quino checkerspot butterfly

CA

Recovery Plan for the Quino Checkerspot Butterfly1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20RP%20Amendment%20for%20QCB_1.pdf

Palos Verdes blue butterfly

CA

Palos Verdes Blue Butterfly Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20RP%20Amendment%20PVB.pdf

San Clemente loggerhead shrike

CA

Recovery Plan for Endangered and Threatened Species of California Channel Islands1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20RP%20Amendment%20for%202%20SCI_shrike%20LIMA_1.pdf

1 Denotes a recovery plan amendment in the “Recovery Plan” column
2 Denotes a full recovery plan revision in the “Recovery Plan” column

Table 2. List of Plants in Batch


Common Name

Current Range

Recovery Plan Name

Internet Availability of Proposed Recovery Plan Revision

Texas poppy-mallow

TX

Texas Poppy-Mallow Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_Texas%20poppy%20mallow_03152019.pdf

Navajo sedge

AZ, UT

Recovery Plan for Navajo Sedge Carex specuicola1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_Navajo%20sedge_03152019.pdf

Nichol’s Turk’s head cactus

AZ

Recovery Plan for Nichol’s Turk’s Head Cactus1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_Nichols%20turks%20head_03152019.pdf

Black lace cactus

TX

Black Lace Cactus Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_black%20lace%20cactus.pdf

Walker’s manioc

TX

Walker’s Manioc Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_Walkers%20manioc_03152019.pdf

Texas wild-rice

TX

San Marcos and Comal Springs and Associated Aquatic Ecosystems (Revised) Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20APG%20RP%20Amendment_San%20Marcos%20and%20Comal%20Springs_1.pdf

Jesup’s milk-vetch

NH, VE

Jesup’s Milk-Vetch Recovery Plan Draft Revised Recovery Plan2

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/20190228_Draft%20JMV%20Recovery%20Plan_1.pdf

Furbish lousewort

ME

Recovery Plan for Furbish’s Lousewort, Draft Second Revision2

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/20190306_Furbish%20lousewort%20RP_draft%20final.pdf

Dudley Bluffs bladderpod

CO

Draft Recovery Plan for the Dudley Bluffs Bladderpod and Dudley Bluffs Twinpod Recovery Plan2

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/20190318_DudleyBluffs_DraftRecoveryPlan.pdf

Dudley Bluffs twinpod

CO

Applegate’s milk-vetch

CA, OR

Applegate’s milk-vetch Recovery Plan1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20RP%20Amendment%20Applegates%20MV_1.pdf

San Clemente Island woodland-star

CA

Recovery Plan for Endangered and Threatened Species of California Channel Islands1

https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/recovery_plan/Draft%20RP%20Amendment%20for%202%20SCI_shrike%20LIMA_1.pdf

1 Denotes a recovery plan amendment in the “Recovery Plan” column
2 Denotes a full recovery plan revision in the “Recovery Plan” column


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